Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

ilovecherrypot

  • 4 years ago

What is the slope of the line which passes through (–6, 0) and (4, 0)?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. saifoo.khan
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    0

  2. Teddy_stephie
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1319609801076:dw|

  3. mathTalk
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    e^2 cos(pi/2)

  4. fewscrewsmissing
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[\Delta Y \div \Delta X\] Or "change in Y over change in X" or "rise over run" So: \[(0 - 0) \div (4--6)\]\[=0 \div 10\]\[=0\]

  5. Teddy_stephie
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    However, the answer is zero, right?

  6. saifoo.khan
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    RIght.

  7. fewscrewsmissing
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes, the slope is 0. Meaning the line will run parallel to the x-axis, offset by whatever constant is added. Generally the equation used is:\[y = mx + c\] or something equivalent. So the line would run parallel to the x-axis at the y value of whatever 'c' is equal to.

  8. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy