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Jaimesha

  • 4 years ago

How do I know when to use Roman Numerals when writing a chemical formula? Anyone know? @Mathematics

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  1. wcaprar
    • 4 years ago
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    You're going to use a Roman numeral if the element is a transition metal.

  2. Jaimesha
    • 4 years ago
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    Thankyou, but how do you know what number to wite?

  3. wcaprar
    • 4 years ago
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    It's going to be based on the charge. For example: Cu3+ (III) Cu2+ (II) Cu1+ (I)

  4. Jaimesha
    • 4 years ago
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    How does Cu have a 3+ charge? My teacher didnt do the charges for the transition metals so I'm a little lost

  5. Jaimesha
    • 4 years ago
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    For instance Lead(IV) oxide. How do you get the IV?

  6. wcaprar
    • 4 years ago
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    Oxygen has a charge of 2-. So that would mean that with PbO the lead has a charge of 2+ and the oxygen has a charge of 2-, giving it an overall charge of 0. But in your case there is a charge of 4- on the lead (because it is Lead (4) oxide), so if oxygen still has a charge of 2-, then there must be two oxygens to make the compound neutral. Therefore, PbO2

  7. wcaprar
    • 4 years ago
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    Does that make sense?

  8. Jaimesha
    • 4 years ago
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    Thankyou:) that makes much sense

  9. Jaimesha
    • 4 years ago
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    I mean I kind of get it better now. But I'm still somewhat confused' but you made it better:)

  10. wcaprar
    • 4 years ago
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    If you have anymore questions, ask, and hopefully I can better clarify it

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