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rld613

  • 3 years ago

lim e^t -t^n as t approaches infinity

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  1. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1322468149480:dw|

  2. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    where n is a positive interger

  3. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks for coming

  4. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    plz help me

  5. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    it is 3:30 and I wanna go to bed

  6. Denebel
    • 3 years ago
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    infinity

  7. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    can u explain how u got that?

  8. Denebel
    • 3 years ago
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    Because to find the limit of the two, you find the limit of each one individually (e^t) and (t^n). you can plug anything into n, like 5. the limit for\[e^\infty\] is infinity. (look at an e^x graph) and limit for \[\infty^5\] will be infinity

  9. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    so it is infinity -infinity

  10. Denebel
    • 3 years ago
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    yeah, poor diction, I know. yes.

  11. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    so what wld the answer be then?

  12. Denebel
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\infty\] because an exponential function increases more rapidly than a function (?)

  13. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    oh true so it wld be infinity. C my book never told me this part!!!!

  14. Denebel
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry, bad at mathematical terminology; if you weren't in a rush I'd Google the right term for it. basically the (e^x) will grow faster than the (t^n) so the limit will be infinity

  15. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    ya i guess the term wld be dominance?

  16. kirbykirby
    • 3 years ago
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    this works to infinity though if n>0

  17. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    yes and this is so

  18. kirbykirby
    • 3 years ago
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    actually it should still be in finity of we had a negative o_O

  19. kirbykirby
    • 3 years ago
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    ya i dont think you can do this one otherwise than looking at the function's 'growth rates"

  20. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    infinity is not a limit so i guess there is no limit

  21. kirbykirby
    • 3 years ago
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    yes infinity is a limit

  22. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    oh ok. Thanks. i appreciate ur help

  23. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    Gnite ;-)

  24. kirbykirby
    • 3 years ago
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    if you had like cos(pi*n) as n->infinity then you can say there is none because it keeps oscillating between -1 and 1

  25. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    oh i see

  26. rld613
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks e/o who helped out I really appreciate it

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