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neverforgetvivistee

  • 3 years ago

HOW DO YOU KNOW WHICH SIDE THETA SHOULD BE ON??

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  1. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    IN A TRIANGLE

  2. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    for basic trig ratios it does

  3. bob06
    • 3 years ago
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    i think. draw a picture and show me your triangle

  4. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1322533988575:dw|

  5. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    sin C

  6. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    what's an easy way to figure out the opposite or adjacent?

  7. bob06
    • 3 years ago
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    The two sides making an angle are adjacent to the angle. The third side, the one that doesn't touch the angle, is the opposite side.

  8. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    The adjacent leg is a non-hypotenuse side that shares the angle. For instance, \(\angle BAC\) has the adjacent side \(\overline{BA}\) and thus opposite side \(\overline{BC}\).

  9. bob06
    • 3 years ago
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    opposite is across from the angle and adjacent is the sides touching the angle.

  10. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    but they're both touching the angle

  11. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    but that's the hypotenuse?

  12. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    opposite and adjacent sides are both touching the angle

  13. bob06
    • 3 years ago
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    oo. sry

  14. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    That was a bad example. \(\overline{BC}\) is not touching \(\angle BAC\).

  15. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    what?

  16. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    yakeyglee can you explain it for 5 year olds because i don't get what you typed

  17. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    The adjacent leg is a non-hypotenuse side that shares the angle. For instance, ∠BAC has the adjacent side BA−−− and thus opposite side BC−−−.

  18. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    please come back PLEASE!!!

  19. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    Do you see how \(\overline{BC}\) is NOT touching \(\angle BAC\)?

  20. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    <bac? the angle whole angle or just one part?

  21. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    What do you mean just part of the angle? The angle formed by points B, A, and C, with A being the vertex. The angle at point A.

  22. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1322534541597:dw| like this?

  23. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    Correct!

  24. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    However, we're considering just the angle part, not the sides itself. The actual angle part (where the bend is) is opposite \(\overline{BC}\), yes?

  25. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    yes... but how do you know that bend part is the opposite? what about the other side where C is?

  26. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1322534666075:dw|

  27. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    That one is adjacent to \(\overline{BC}\) because it literally lies right next to \(\overline{BC}\).

  28. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    Whereas \(\angle BAC\) does not.

  29. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    so bc is where your angle lies? why not ba?

  30. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    \(\overline{BC}\) is the leg next to \(\angle BCA\) so thus it is the adjacent side to \(\angle BCA\). The other leg (\(\overline{BA}\)) is NOT next to \(\angle BCA\) so therefore it is the opposite leg.

  31. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    why is bca important? is it because it has the hypotenuse?

  32. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    No, because it's an angle in the triangle that's not the right-angle!

  33. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    huh?? what about bac?

  34. neverforgetvivistee
    • 3 years ago
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    please don't give up on me :( i have a huge test tomorrow and i'll get an F if i don't get this

  35. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    Look at this picture and just memorize which sides correspond to which terms relative to the labeled angle. Beware that the letters are labeled slightly different in this picture than yours (so you must be able to identify which is which without angles and sides labeled -- if someone points to an angle in a right triangle, you should be able to say which is the adjacent and which is the opposite.). I honestly don't know how to explain this any clearer. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_mVk-nEnsSXI/S_UDj_mE8lI/AAAAAAAAADI/X9ULOiOGIJ0/s1600/tric.png

  36. yakeyglee
    • 3 years ago
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    The labeled angle in that image would be your \(\theta\).

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