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askme12345

  • 4 years ago

Difference between an oblique and horizontal asymptote?

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  1. imranmeah91
    • 4 years ago
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    if numerator is one degree larger than denominator you have oblique asymtote

  2. askme12345
    • 4 years ago
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    how do you find the horizontal asymptote/oblique?

  3. imranmeah91
    • 4 years ago
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    horizontal is very easy. if you have same degree numerator and denominator , just divide the coeficcient 4x^2 -------------- = > 4/2 = > horizontal retricemtote=> y=2 2 x^2

  4. askme12345
    • 4 years ago
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    what about vertical? thanks so much!!

  5. imranmeah91
    • 4 years ago
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    vertical or oblique?

  6. askme12345
    • 4 years ago
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    I need to know both haha -

  7. imranmeah91
    • 4 years ago
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    Vertical for vertical asymtote , look for where function is inderminant(0 in denominator) (x^2-3x) ------------ (x-5) in this case when x=5 , denominator is 0 which makes function inderminant so vertical asymtote x=5

  8. imranmeah91
    • 4 years ago
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    Oblique when numerator is one degree bigger than denominator (x^3+x^2+x+1)/(x^2+x+1) use long division to divide it out http://www4b.wolframalpha.com/Calculate/MSP/MSP53619icgb4di5hgchfe00003fc2e54f7d06c4a5?MSPStoreType=image/gif&s=21&w=204&h=131 y=x is our oblique asymtote

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