Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

srev98

  • 4 years ago

what is the value of pie(22\7)????

  • This Question is Closed
  1. meverett04
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 8

    Do you mean how close is 22/7 to the value of pie? Pie is irrational and goes on forever after the decimal 3.141592654,,,,, 22/7 is close to pi 22/7 = 3.142857143

  2. FoolForMath
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \( \large \pi \neq \frac{22}7 \)

  3. srev98
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thnx,but isnt it 3.14387???

  4. FoolForMath
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    No, \( \pi \) is irrational so it's non-terminating and non-recurring , all we can do is approximate to desired digits..

  5. srev98
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but specific 22\7

  6. srev98
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ???

  7. FoolForMath
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    22\7 is not a good approximation of pi in real mathematics, but works in grade school though.

  8. meverett04
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 8

    Not sure what you are asking 22/7 is not 3.14387.... but it is 3.14287 which is close to pi

  9. srev98
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thnx

  10. jimmyrep
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the history of pi is very interesting on http://www.gap-system.org/~history/HistTopics/Pi_through_the_ages.html

  11. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy