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creekrat48

from this graph How much nitrogen-14 will be produced from a 200-g sample of carbon-14 after 17,190 years?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. creekrat48
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    • 2 years ago
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  2. zbay
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    how many half lifes is that?

    • 2 years ago
  3. creekrat48
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    I am still reading these half lifes in book so confused

    • 2 years ago
  4. zbay
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    3 half lifes meaning there will be an 8th of the atoms left, can you go from mass to atoms?

    • 2 years ago
  5. creekrat48
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    I just got that as you did

    • 2 years ago
  6. zbay
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    No i would calculate the atoms total and then divide them by 3/4 and those would be the ones that are N

    • 2 years ago
  7. zbay
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    now ^

    • 2 years ago
  8. creekrat48
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    I'm sorry I just don't understand with the 200 gram sample

    • 2 years ago
  9. zbay
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    do you know how to go from mass-->moles-->atoms?

    • 2 years ago
  10. creekrat48
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    i have done it before but would have to go back into book to reread again

    • 2 years ago
  11. zbay
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    \[200g(\frac{1 mole c}{12.01g c})\frac{6.022x10^23 c atom}{1 mole c})\] that will get you atoms,

    • 2 years ago
  12. creekrat48
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    oh my

    • 2 years ago
  13. zbay
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    Does that look like anything you have ever done?

    • 2 years ago
  14. creekrat48
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    yes

    • 2 years ago
  15. creekrat48
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    not that complex

    • 2 years ago
  16. zbay
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    1.00x10^25 is the total (I think i'm using a jankie calculator) now just multiply that number by .875 and that will be the number of nitrogen

    • 2 years ago
  17. creekrat48
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    zbay thank you I guess some people just don't understand that it just doesn't click for me. Another guy was very mean like I am some dumbass.

    • 2 years ago
  18. zbay
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    No chemistry is a ball buster, it takes a lot of practice and everything builds on previous knowledge. If you keep pluging away at it i'm sure you will get a handle on this subject. Good luck and keep asking questions!

    • 2 years ago
  19. creekrat48
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    in 3 half-lifes, 200g carbon-14 will decay to 100-50-25g, so taking that carbon-14 decays to nitrogen-14, 175 g is produced or using the half-life formula, amount of nitrogen-14 produced = 200 - 200*0.5^(17190/5730) = 175 g

    • 2 years ago
  20. zbay
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    Thats a much easier way to do it, It can be calculated the way i explained it sorry if i added to the confusion

    • 2 years ago
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