anonymous
  • anonymous
from this graph How much nitrogen-14 will be produced from a 200-g sample of carbon-14 after 17,190 years?
Chemistry
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
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anonymous
  • anonymous
how many half lifes is that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am still reading these half lifes in book so confused

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anonymous
  • anonymous
3 half lifes meaning there will be an 8th of the atoms left, can you go from mass to atoms?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I just got that as you did
anonymous
  • anonymous
No i would calculate the atoms total and then divide them by 3/4 and those would be the ones that are N
anonymous
  • anonymous
now ^
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm sorry I just don't understand with the 200 gram sample
anonymous
  • anonymous
do you know how to go from mass-->moles-->atoms?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i have done it before but would have to go back into book to reread again
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[200g(\frac{1 mole c}{12.01g c})\frac{6.022x10^23 c atom}{1 mole c})\] that will get you atoms,
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh my
anonymous
  • anonymous
Does that look like anything you have ever done?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
not that complex
anonymous
  • anonymous
1.00x10^25 is the total (I think i'm using a jankie calculator) now just multiply that number by .875 and that will be the number of nitrogen
anonymous
  • anonymous
zbay thank you I guess some people just don't understand that it just doesn't click for me. Another guy was very mean like I am some dumbass.
anonymous
  • anonymous
No chemistry is a ball buster, it takes a lot of practice and everything builds on previous knowledge. If you keep pluging away at it i'm sure you will get a handle on this subject. Good luck and keep asking questions!
anonymous
  • anonymous
in 3 half-lifes, 200g carbon-14 will decay to 100-50-25g, so taking that carbon-14 decays to nitrogen-14, 175 g is produced or using the half-life formula, amount of nitrogen-14 produced = 200 - 200*0.5^(17190/5730) = 175 g
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thats a much easier way to do it, It can be calculated the way i explained it sorry if i added to the confusion

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