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UnkleRhaukus

  • 2 years ago

How is there such a thing as Negative Temperature?

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  1. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    In Kelvin?

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    yeah, negative energies and LASERs

  3. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    dosent make much sense to me at the moment

  4. Vibhor16
    • 2 years ago
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    There is no such thin as negative temperature/energy.We just take a measurement as standard limit and if the temperature/energy is below the standard limit it is represented in negative.For example:-standard limit of temperature is 0 degree Celsius(freezing point of water) but for scientific use we take kelvin(+273).

  5. Ricardo_95
    • 2 years ago
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    Negative temperature is a statistical mechanical concept - for more information see the book Física Molecular of Kikoin and Kikoin

  6. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    ok so ive done a lil bit of research, and it turns out that when there is an inversion layer (the electrons are more likely to be in the excited state ) this is called negative temperature. it kinda makes sense because heat will flow from the specie at negative temp. It gets a bit confusing when you also have a high energy state (positive temp), because the high energy state will be receiving the heat flow form the negative temperature specie. If a specie is in a negative temperature state it effectively has more energy that any positive state. Without negative temperature , LASERs would not be possible

  7. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    cool stuff

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