Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Inopeki

  • 2 years ago

TuringTest, what now?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Party time! :D

  2. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    lol I dunno...

  3. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What can you teach me?

  4. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    a lot, there's a fair amount to algebra, but what's the next logical step?

  5. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Teach about polynomial.

  6. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    I have already to an extent, but where to go next...

  7. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ratios?

  8. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    In maths the fundamentals concepts are limited but the problems are not, so how about practicing what you have already learned?

  9. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    That's a good point FFM so lets do simplification that you know, but a little more intense: I think I need to make sure you can simplify bigger things:\[\frac{x^2y^5z}{xy^9z^3}\]

  10. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  11. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    awww, you're making me think of my cat in the hospital :(

  12. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How did it go with her?

  13. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    broken leg... waiting for an operation

  14. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You beat you cat Turing?!!!

  15. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    aww :(

  16. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    turing sat on her leg. :(

  17. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    she fell off the roof. how pessimistic

  18. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    awww, sorry i was jking..

  19. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    It's all good :P

  20. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Due to Turing's intense physics stress his cat decided to commit suicide :P

  21. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x^2)*(y^5)*(z) ------------ = (x)*(y^5/9)*(z^1/3)? (x)*(y^9)*(z^3)

  22. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  23. GT
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Cats are cool.

  24. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    why \( y^{5/9} \) ?

  25. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no doubt. ;)

  26. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    you have inconsistent rules above inopeki\[\frac{x^a}{x^b}=x^{a-b}\]always...

  27. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://i.imgur.com/48wOw.jpg

  28. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh right

  29. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x^2)*(y^5)*(z) ------------ = (x)*(y^5-9)*(z^1-3)? (x)*(y^9)*(z^3)

  30. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    yes, simplify...

  31. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  32. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x)*(y^5-9)*(z^1-3)=(x)*(y^-4)*(z^-2)?

  33. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://i.imgur.com/6uzXf.jpg

  34. saifoo.khan
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    cute^

  35. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    yes, do you know another way to write\[x^{-a}\]???

  36. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No

  37. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://i.imgur.com/eqTIb.jpg

  38. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    \[x^{-a}=\frac{1}{x^a}\]so it's probably nicer to rewrite your expression with all positive exponents in this way.

  39. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh right, all negative exponents make the "total number" divided by one.

  40. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Btw who can explain why x^0 = 1?

  41. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x)*(1/y^4)*(1/z^2)

  42. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Oh dear... I have my answers about x^0=1 (not true for x=0), but I'm sure FFM would not approve of them :/ @inopeki, yes now rewrite it as 1 fraction...

  43. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Turing that's a very important yet fundamental question.

  44. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    another one is why \( (a^b)^c = a^{bc} \) ?

  45. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    well I have a very simple proof of it and I can show why it is not true for x=0 what more do I need in your opinion?

  46. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    the last rule is easier to explain, perhaps I should...

  47. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x)*(1/y^4)*(1/z^2) (x)*(1/y^4*z^2)?

  48. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    yes, now write it as a fraction what goes on the bottom? what goes on the top?

  49. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    @FFMactually that's not so easy to explain now that I think about it.

  50. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Can you explain the second rule intuitively?

  51. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 x* -------- y^4*z^2

  52. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    no, I was thinking more of how easy it is to show x^ax^b=x^(a+b) intuitively, the other is tricky to me.

  53. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    @ inopeki you can put the x on top, it means the same thing and looks nicer

  54. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x*1 -------- y^4*z^2

  55. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Can we say that all power function obeys the functional equation \( f(x)f(y)= f(x+y) \)?

  56. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Whats that f?

  57. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    @Inopeki yes, no need to write the 1 though @FFM, I'd have to think about that :/

  58. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    unspecified functions he's asking how far the rule about exponents can be extended..

  59. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x -------- Oh right y^4*z^2

  60. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Actually we can't but I believe that is true for exponential functions though.

  61. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Umm, ok?

  62. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    it must be for simple ones\[2^x2^y=2^{x+y}\]of course

  63. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Tha's whats Inopeki is using right ?

  64. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    basically Inopeki do you see the connection between what you are doing and the rule for multiplying exponents like\[x^ax^b\]?

  65. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yeah, but does that mean that it becomes x -------- ? yz^6

  66. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    no because y and z are different bases notice the rule above had both base x.

  67. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    YEah but then i dont see the connection..

  68. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    just that dividing and multiplying are inverse operations x^a=x*x*x*...*x (a times) x^b=x*x*x*...*x (b times) so if we have a=3 b=2 we get x^a --- x^b x*x*x =-----= x x*x which is x^(a-b) if we have (x^a)(x^b) we get (x*x*x)(x*x)=x*x*x*x*x=x^(a+b) so the rules for exponents here come directly from their definitions. You can count the x and see that this relationship holds.

  69. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I know about that, like x^2*x^8=x^10

  70. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x^10/x^5=x^5

  71. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Basic

  72. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    right, I want you to see how that and the rule for division are inverses of each other for a reason...

  73. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Turing you have a heck of patience :D

  74. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    eh it's easy FFM, doesn't require too much concentration. good practice too I learn by teaching ;) ok factor \[3x^3y^3+6xy+9x^2y\]

  75. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    :-)

  76. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The GCF of 3,6,9 is 3 The GCF of x,x^2,x^3 is x The GCF of y,y^2,y^3 is y 3xy(3x^3*y^3/3xy)+3xy(6xy/3xy)+3xy(9x^2*y/3xy) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Middle step, right?

  77. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    yes exactly

  78. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    3xy(3x^3*y^3/3xy)+3xy(6xy/3xy)+3xy(9x^2*y/3xy)=3xy(x^2*y^2+2+3x)?

  79. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    yep :) great!

  80. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Really? :D

  81. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Note to Inopeki: Turing is a great resource, learn new things from him and practice as much as you can on your own :-)

  82. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Yes I've stressed the importance of studying on your own as well and yes Inopeki really, FFM would have noticed a mistake I'm sure ok quick, foil (a-b)(a+b)

  83. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    When hes not here i try to go on purplemath and khan :)

  84. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a^2+ab-ba-b^2

  85. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    simplify

  86. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Books books books!! online learning has it's own limitation :-)

  87. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a^2-b^2?

  88. Akshay_Budhkar
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it doesnt @ffm i disagree

  89. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Foolformath, im having trouble finding books here in sweden

  90. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    and what is the name of that form? remember?

  91. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The fundamental theorem of algebra? Or want that the one with the multiplex?

  92. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Multiplex? no I think you're thinking of 'multiplicity' but this is the 'difference of squares' \[a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\]

  93. Akshay_Budhkar
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    with ocw.mit , khan, purple math and openstudy and people like turing there is no limit to online education ^

  94. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Thanks but you get what you put in, I think is true with all this stuff.

  95. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh right

  96. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    The fundamental theorem of algebra: "the sum of the multiplicity of the roots of a polynomial is equal to its order" difference of squares\[a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\]both important, but very different

  97. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    so remember that we can run this backwards, and I can say 'factor'\[x^2-4\]using difference of squares wanna try?

  98. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    run the FOIL backwards I meant*

  99. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x(x-4)?

  100. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh

  101. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    no look at the form\[a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\]so what is a and b in\[x^2-4\]???

  102. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x-2)(x+2)?

  103. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    there ya go :)

  104. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    how about\[x^4-y^4\](this is a favorite question on OS)

  105. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x^2-y^2)(x^2+y^2)

  106. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Why?

  107. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    good, now is that all we can do with it though? (I've seen a lot of tutors stop here too ;-)

  108. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    hint:look at the first set of parentheses

  109. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ummm

  110. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    what is the first sett of parentheses?

  111. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x^2-y^2)?

  112. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    yes, and can you factor that?

  113. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    GCF of x^2 is x GCF of y^2 is y xy(x^2/xy)-xy(y^2/xy)?

  114. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    no you're over-thinking x^2-y^2 is difference of squares again!

  115. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    \[a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\]

  116. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So (x-y)(x+y)?

  117. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    yes! so now factor\[p^4-q^4\]completely!!

  118. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    you will apply difference of squares twice

  119. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (p^2-q^2)(p^2+q^2) (p-q)(p+q)(p+q)+(p+q)?

  120. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Without the +

  121. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    between the parenthesis

  122. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    (p^2-q^2)(p^2+q^2) stop here we cannot factor the second set of parentheses, it is not a /difference/ of squares, it is a /sum/ of squares, and we have no formula for that. check that (a+b)(a+b) is not a^2+b^2 so only factor the one that is a /difference/ of squares

  123. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (p-q)(p+q)(p^2+q^2) You said i had to do difference in squares 2 times? Btw, lets move to a new thread, this one is starting to lag a little bit

  124. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    That is above correct, you did difference of squares twice: p^4-q^4 (p^2-q^2)(p^2+q^2) <-once (p-q)(p+q)(p^2+q^2) <-twice ok new thread...

  125. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ohhh

  126. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.