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Inopeki

  • 2 years ago

TuringTest, repetition!

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  1. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    repetition?

  2. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    You know, practising something you have learned

  3. sunsetlove
    • 2 years ago
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    ?

  4. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Oh maybe thats not a word xd

  5. imranmeah91
    • 2 years ago
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    revision

  6. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    factor\[x^2y^4-x^4y^2\]

  7. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Ohhh, im thinking of the swedish word..

  8. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    repetition is a word, just not the right one

  9. GT
    • 2 years ago
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    Again??

  10. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    GCF of x^2 and x^4 is x^2 GCF of y^2 and y^4 is y^2 x^2*y^2(x^2*y^4/x^2*y^2)-x^2*y^2(x^4*y^2/x^2*y^2)?

  11. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    yes that should work :) and yes, /again/ GT lol continue Inopeki.

  12. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    x^2*y^2(x^2*y^4/x^2*y^2)-x^2*y^2(x^4*y^2/x^2*y^2)=x^2*y^2(y^2-x^2)? Damn thats a long line of numbers!

  13. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    lol yeah, but you got the right answer :D but I think there's one more thing you can do, look closely.

  14. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    x^2*y^2(x^2*y^4/x^2*y^2)-x^2*y^2(x^4*y^2/x^2*y^2)=-x^4*y^4?

  15. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    x^2*y^2(x^2*y^4/x^2*y^2)-x^2*y^2(x^4*y^2/x^2*y^2)=(-x^4)*y^4?

  16. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    who who you got much closer with x^2*y^2(y^2-x^2) but is there something familiar here?

  17. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    x^2*y^2(y-x)(y+x)?

  18. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    yes :) good job, tricky one!

  19. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Thanks :DDD

  20. imranmeah91
    • 2 years ago
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    one step closer to quantum mechanics

  21. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    :D baby steps are still steps, right?

  22. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    true that :) hey you're going plenty fast you've got time... hmmm do you know how to find the slope of a line give two points?

  23. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, if i remember right.

  24. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    ok (1,4) (6,12) what is the slope between the points?

  25. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Well 12+4 ----- Doing alright? 6+1

  26. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    - actually

  27. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    gotta subtract, yes the reason for this is important to understand you should think about it if you can

  28. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    No wait

  29. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    12-4 ----- =8/5 6-1

  30. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    right rise over run remember that rise and run are about changes, and to find the change in x or y we must subtract, so it makes sense. what about the equation of the line? any ideas?

  31. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\Delta y \div \Delta x\]

  32. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    perfect, even better way to think of it :) now the equation of the line that passes through (1,4) (6,12) do you know how to find that?

  33. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1326067972678:dw|

  34. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    I need to get x first then substitute to get y?

  35. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    no, you use the 'Point-Slope' form of the line:\[y-y_1=m(x-x_1)\]where m is the slope (which you have already found) and (x_1,y_1) are the coordinates of one of your points (it doesn't matter which) can you get the equation of the line now?

  36. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Wait, 12-4=8/5(6-1)?

  37. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    no, just use one of the points, the other x and y without subscripts (the little number 1) are just left as x and y...

  38. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Oh, y-12=8/5(x-6)?

  39. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    right, that is the equation in point-slope form there is another form called slope-intercept form that looks like\[y=mx+b\]where b is the y-intercept. Our equation will be in this form if we solve for y, so do that.

  40. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    y=8/5(x-6)-12?

  41. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    it would be +12 right? but distribute 8/5 to the parentheses as well to get slope-intercept form.

  42. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    y=12+(8/5)*(x-6)?

  43. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    yes now distribute the 8/5...

  44. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    in order to get rid of the parentheses...

  45. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    y=12+(8/5)x-6?

  46. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    you forgot to distribute to the 6...

  47. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    y=12+(8/5)x-(6)?

  48. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    (8/5)(x-6) distribute the 8/5 to each term, that is how distribution always works.

  49. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    a(b+c)=ab+ac

  50. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    But i did that before!

  51. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    and what did you get?

  52. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Aw man, i need some sleep. school starts tomorrow and its 1:30am XD Im screwed!

  53. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
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    lol Thought so... goodnight, good work :)

  54. Inopeki
    • 2 years ago
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    Goognight! Thanks again for teaching me all this :)

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