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Mashy

Why is line emission spectrum a characterisitc? As i understand, the spectrum is obtained because electrons get excited and come back to normal state emitting a photon of a particular wavelength which we see as a line.. What i don't understand is, if an electron of sodium get excited and come back and emit a particular wavelength, why can't any other atom's electron do it as well?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. silencezon100
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    i think bcoz every element has its own difference in energy levels. the photon emitted has energy equal to the difference between its higher energy state and lower enery state. \[hf=E2-E1\]

    • 2 years ago
  2. Mashy
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    yea thats what i understand too, so what you mean to say is, that an electron of one partiucular atom has a set of energy levels that it can acquire and an electron from another atom(another element) has a different set of energy levels which it can acquire?

    • 2 years ago
  3. silencezon100
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    sodium doesnt give line spectrum btw. it gives continuous spectrum.... i read that somewhere.

    • 2 years ago
  4. Mashy
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    noo.. i am reading in a book right now sodium gives line spectrum consisting of 2 lines they are called D lines.. D1 and D2.. around 500nm range (wavelentgh)

    • 2 years ago
  5. silencezon100
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    it doesnt aquire energy level. the electron jumps from lower energy state E1 to higher energy state E2. thats when the phon of specific wavelength is emitted.

    • 2 years ago
  6. silencezon100
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    photon*

    • 2 years ago
  7. Mashy
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    Yes silence i understand that, but what i don't understand is, if for one atom, an electron can jump from its ground state to E2, why can't an electron of some other atom also jump to that exactly same energy state, so in a such a case, the emitted photon in both atoms would of the same wavelength

    • 2 years ago
  8. silencezon100
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    sorry i meant when it de-excites from E2 to E1

    • 2 years ago
  9. silencezon100
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    because energy levels are different for different elements.

    • 2 years ago
  10. Mashy
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    Do you know the reason for that? :D.. cause energy levels which an electron can acquire shouldn't be dependent on which atom it resides in it right?

    • 2 years ago
  11. Mashy
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    which atom it resides in*

    • 2 years ago
  12. silencezon100
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    lol if i was an atom i would have certainly known :P

    • 2 years ago
  13. Mashy
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    awww.. I wanna know.. I am not able to find it on the net either..

    • 2 years ago
  14. silencezon100
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    perhaps coz of subshells

    • 2 years ago
  15. JamesJ
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    Every atom has a set of energy levels for the electrons. The gaps between those energy levels are the only set of possible absorption/emission lines for that type of atom. Now, why do different atoms have different energy levels for electrons? That's something deep about the nature of the quantum mechanics of atoms. The short answer is the number of protons in the nucleus influences how the electrons around it can be and are distributed.

    • 2 years ago
  16. JamesJ
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    You might find this interesting: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/chemistry/5-111-principles-of-chemical-science-fall-2008/video-lectures/lecture-8/

    • 2 years ago
  17. Mashy
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    thanks james.. so i believe my concept is right, if i am to get a solution i need to dig deeper

    • 2 years ago
  18. JamesJ
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    (About 11 minutes into the lecture, she touches on why the orbitals in mutli-electron atoms are smaller than the corresponding shells for Hydrogen; but the whole lecture is interesting ;-) )

    • 2 years ago
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