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Can someone tutor me in multiplying and dividing radicals? Please no nonsense I want to learning

Mathematics
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Hm..i said that i will help you :/
|dw:1326159651743:dw|
Just multiply. \[5*7\sqrt{8*3} \]

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Other answers:

\[{1 \over√a} = {1 \over√a} \times {√a \over √a}={√a \over a}\]
so?
can't you times it.
Yes!
|dw:1326159934510:dw|
Correct!
Want to simplify it further?
yes please
how do you simplify it further?
what times what gives 24, 6*4 so 35(6)^(1/2)*(4)^(1/2) or \[35\sqrt{4}\sqrt{6}\]
can we simplify it further
now you can take the square root of 4 which is 2 therefore you are left with 35(2)(6)^(1/2)
which is just equal to \[70\sqrt{6}\]
so its |dw:1326160227547:dw|
how can we simplify it their?
you can't
if you take the square root of 2 you end up with an irrational number which can only be approximated
Pokemon, you can just use a calculator to check, if you type that in the calculator, it won't equal the same to \[5\sqrt{8}*7\sqrt{3} \]
|dw:1326160630061:dw| to the solution
\[35*2\sqrt{6} \]
since \[\sqrt{4} = 2\]
how? how did you get the solution
Hmm...where don't you understand? It has been explained thoroughly.
2*2 is = 4, when you take the square of a number it will tell you what two exact numbers can be multiplied together to give you the original number
Radicals are simply the opposite of exponents. If you had just say 3^(3) = (3)(3)(3) = 27 27^(1/3) =3
Thus (4)^(1/2) = 2 because 2*2 = 4
You need to memorize the fundamental rule in radicals that (ab)^(1/2) = \[\sqrt{a}\sqrt{b}\]
if you wish to simplify radicals further, usually I'm to lazy to do this though :d
You can simplify it further but you don't need to, it depends on the question.
In your case 35(24)^(1/2) = \[35\sqrt{6}\sqrt{4}\]
thanks for the help
since 35 is being multiplied by the radical when (4)^(1/2) is simplified to 2 you are left with 35(2)(6)^(1/2) if you take the square root of 6 you are going to end up with a very ugly number and in mathematics they usually like you to deal with exact numbers
you can reduce to 35|dw:1326161502375:dw|
No problem I hope you have gained a better understanding of radicals, I would recommend look up the fundamental rules of radicals
Once you know all the basic algebraic laws, math becomes a lot easier
the final answer being 70(6)^(1/2) but I will stop posting now :D

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