anonymous
  • anonymous
why is the moon have 6th less gravity than earth when the raidus is smaller ?
Physics
katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
*radius
anonymous
  • anonymous
The smaller the object, the lower the attraction due to gravity. i.e. Smaller object = smaller gravity.
anonymous
  • anonymous
its not only about the size the gravitation depends on mass as well if any object has got high density then it have more gravity despite of its smaller size....

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes. By small, I meant "less massive"
anonymous
  • anonymous
i m nt gud at all in this subject so plz ans it a easier way by explaining me thanQ...
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay here i go....gravitation law as stated by newton is F=G m1* m2/r^2 so higher the masses the more the attraction and more the distance lower it is...now in case of moon it has got density nearly to earth but smaller than earth so it has got lower gravity..hope ur clear
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok.. can any one explain me the whole chapter.. plzz
anonymous
  • anonymous
@henna how like this.. am new to this
anonymous
  • anonymous
Mass is a way to measure how hard it is to move something. The more "mass" something has, the heavier it seems to be, and the more gravity it has. Everything with mass pulls other things with mass towards itself. The more "mass" it has, the harder it pulls. The moon has less "mass" (it's less massive - it's smaller). Some things are the same size, but have different mass. A ball and a lead weight of the same size will weigh differently. The lead weight has more "mass" even though they are the same size. The moon is both smaller (in size) and less dense (less massive) that the earth, so it has much less gravity. It doesn't pull as hard as the earth.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok.. can u teach me i ll give u link of other site..?? where u can teach me??
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont mind
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok..
Underhill
  • Underhill
Kirti: Gravity is an inherent property of mass. It is not something applied TO mass, but something that every mass has. The gravitational force exerted on you by a mass decreases as you move away from the mass, and increases as you move toward it. The strength of the gravitational attraction between one mass and another mass has been experimentally discovered; the resulting coefficient we call G. \[g = GM_1M_2/R^2\] \[M_1\] is the first mass; \[M_2\] is the second mass; and \[R^2\] is the distance between the two masses, squared.
anonymous
  • anonymous
do i know u??
anonymous
  • anonymous
@underhill who are you??
Underhill
  • Underhill
You don't know me. I'm from Ohio. :-)
Underhill
  • Underhill
By the way, the equation in my first post should begin:\[F_g\] not \[g\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
then how u know my name??
Underhill
  • Underhill
Ah, I see. That's not hard to explain. Change your profile settings if you don't want your name public. ;-)
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is a typical gravitational question well the only reason is given by newtons law F=G1XG2/r^2.
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry M1XM2
Underhill
  • Underhill
Don't forget the gravitational constant, G, in front of the whole thing.\[F_g = GM_1M_2/R^2\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah but it was explained above so i didnt mentioned it
Underhill
  • Underhill
But your equation is incorrect without it...
anonymous
  • anonymous
technically,i made it g1Xg2 so i thgt i had written G
Underhill
  • Underhill
Oh, I see - I could have made that mistake. Keep up the good work!
anonymous
  • anonymous
well @underhill frodo is my fav fantasy character.so kudos to you too

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