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heena

why is the moon have 6th less gravity than earth when the raidus is smaller ?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. heena
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    *radius

    • 2 years ago
  2. Toolan
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    The smaller the object, the lower the attraction due to gravity. i.e. Smaller object = smaller gravity.

    • 2 years ago
  3. crazyjairam
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    its not only about the size the gravitation depends on mass as well if any object has got high density then it have more gravity despite of its smaller size....

    • 2 years ago
  4. Toolan
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    Yes. By small, I meant "less massive"

    • 2 years ago
  5. heena
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    i m nt gud at all in this subject so plz ans it a easier way by explaining me thanQ...

    • 2 years ago
  6. crazyjairam
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    okay here i go....gravitation law as stated by newton is F=G m1* m2/r^2 so higher the masses the more the attraction and more the distance lower it is...now in case of moon it has got density nearly to earth but smaller than earth so it has got lower gravity..hope ur clear

    • 2 years ago
  7. heena
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    ok.. can any one explain me the whole chapter.. plzz

    • 2 years ago
  8. crazyjairam
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    @henna how like this.. am new to this

    • 2 years ago
  9. Toolan
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    Mass is a way to measure how hard it is to move something. The more "mass" something has, the heavier it seems to be, and the more gravity it has. Everything with mass pulls other things with mass towards itself. The more "mass" it has, the harder it pulls. The moon has less "mass" (it's less massive - it's smaller). Some things are the same size, but have different mass. A ball and a lead weight of the same size will weigh differently. The lead weight has more "mass" even though they are the same size. The moon is both smaller (in size) and less dense (less massive) that the earth, so it has much less gravity. It doesn't pull as hard as the earth.

    • 2 years ago
  10. heena
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    ok.. can u teach me i ll give u link of other site..?? where u can teach me??

    • 2 years ago
  11. crazyjairam
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    i dont mind

    • 2 years ago
  12. heena
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    ok..

    • 2 years ago
  13. Underhill
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    Kirti: Gravity is an inherent property of mass. It is not something applied TO mass, but something that every mass has. The gravitational force exerted on you by a mass decreases as you move away from the mass, and increases as you move toward it. The strength of the gravitational attraction between one mass and another mass has been experimentally discovered; the resulting coefficient we call G. \[g = GM_1M_2/R^2\] \[M_1\] is the first mass; \[M_2\] is the second mass; and \[R^2\] is the distance between the two masses, squared.

    • 2 years ago
  14. heena
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    do i know u??

    • 2 years ago
  15. heena
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    @underhill who are you??

    • 2 years ago
  16. Underhill
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    You don't know me. I'm from Ohio. :-)

    • 2 years ago
  17. Underhill
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    By the way, the equation in my first post should begin:\[F_g\] not \[g\]

    • 2 years ago
  18. heena
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    then how u know my name??

    • 2 years ago
  19. Underhill
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    Ah, I see. That's not hard to explain. Change your profile settings if you don't want your name public. ;-)

    • 2 years ago
  20. fortheloveofscience
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    this is a typical gravitational question well the only reason is given by newtons law F=G1XG2/r^2.

    • 2 years ago
  21. fortheloveofscience
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    sorry M1XM2

    • 2 years ago
  22. Underhill
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    Don't forget the gravitational constant, G, in front of the whole thing.\[F_g = GM_1M_2/R^2\]

    • 2 years ago
  23. fortheloveofscience
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    yeah but it was explained above so i didnt mentioned it

    • 2 years ago
  24. Underhill
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    But your equation is incorrect without it...

    • 2 years ago
  25. fortheloveofscience
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    technically,i made it g1Xg2 so i thgt i had written G

    • 2 years ago
  26. Underhill
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    Oh, I see - I could have made that mistake. Keep up the good work!

    • 2 years ago
  27. fortheloveofscience
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    well @underhill frodo is my fav fantasy character.so kudos to you too

    • 2 years ago
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