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athitaya

  • 4 years ago

how do you measure a curve???

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  1. agdgdgdgwngo
    • 4 years ago
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    You mean out of a shape?

  2. athitaya
    • 4 years ago
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    yes, curved hexagon

  3. agdgdgdgwngo
    • 4 years ago
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    curved hexagon O.o

  4. agdgdgdgwngo
    • 4 years ago
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    do you mean a circle with an inscribed hexagon?

  5. athitaya
    • 4 years ago
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    no not really, its hard to explain , sorry

  6. agdgdgdgwngo
    • 4 years ago
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    just draw it :-P

  7. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    inch by inch

  8. agdgdgdgwngo
    • 4 years ago
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    that's how you normally approximate it, right

  9. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1326317247010:dw|

  10. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    consider a given segment and approximate it with a straight line; distance = \(\sqrt{\Delta x^2 + \Delta y^2}\)

  11. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    as you make the change in x smaller and smaller you get a better approximation

  12. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    when you get to the infinitesimal level; the change in x and y are dx and dy

  13. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    \[\int_{a}^{b}\sqrt{dx^2+dy^2}\ ds\]

  14. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    ...curved hexagon? hmm

  15. athitaya
    • 4 years ago
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    thank you for your help

  16. agdgdgdgwngo
    • 4 years ago
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    right; use amistre's formula to approximate the length of curves and arcs in graphs.

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