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Inopeki

If muons are identical to electrons (exept for the weight), why aren't there muons flowing through object with electrical "charge"?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. Inopeki
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    Objects*

    • 2 years ago
  2. JamesJ
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    Unlike electrons, muons are unstable and decay on average in 2.2 microseconds.

    • 2 years ago
  3. Inopeki
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    Oh! Finally got that book! By the way, are atomic bombs made by splitting the atom nucleus?

    • 2 years ago
  4. Inopeki
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    Are gluons the source of the strong force?

    • 2 years ago
  5. JamesJ
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    By the way, are atomic bombs made by splitting the atom nucleus? Yes, Uranium and Plutonium atoms mostly. Are gluons the source of the strong force? "Source" isn't quite the right term; but intermediators, perhaps, yes.

    • 2 years ago
  6. Inopeki
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    It says here that the electromagnetic repulsion force is 10^24 times more powerful than the gravitational force, does that explain why electrons dont crash in their orbit around an atom nucleus?

    • 2 years ago
  7. Inopeki
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    Oh, but why specifically plutonium and uranium atoms? Is it because they have the biggest nucleus?

    • 2 years ago
  8. JamesJ
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    does that explain why electrons dont crash in their orbit around an atom nucleus? No, it has something to do with how electrons can be configured around the nucleus of an atom. it turns out with non-zero probability, the electron spends time in the nucleus, but it doesn't interact with it. This is quite counter-intuitive to our everyday understanding of how matter works, but that's the way it is. why specifically plutonium and uranium atoms? Is it because they have the biggest nucleus? They are large and they are unstable. Them in particular because when they decay they also generate free neutrons, which can go on to collide with other nucleii, causing them to break apart, generating more neutrons, and so on. This is called a chain reaction. http://www.world-mysteries.com/fission1.gif

    • 2 years ago
  9. Inopeki
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    But why exactly do we want "free" neutrons flying around? It seems kind of worthless, considering that it only breaks through atoms. I mean what is the use of an atom if its in 2 parts?

    • 2 years ago
  10. Inopeki
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    Oh! Now i see it, is that what they do at nuclear reactors? Im not sure they are called that but the places where nuclear energy is made.

    • 2 years ago
  11. Inopeki
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    Not made, but converted from nuclear to electrical energy and such.

    • 2 years ago
  12. Inopeki
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    Is unified field theory the base of string theory?

    • 2 years ago
  13. JamesJ
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    We want neutrons generated because they can interact with additional atoms and sustain the reaction. In a nuclear fission bomb, that process quickly becomes run away and generates a huge amount of energy. In a nuclear power plant, the block of reacting material has running through it a set of control rods made of material that absorbs to neutrons; through that mechanism the rate of the reaction is controlled and does not run away. In the most important nuclear power plant accidents, one way or another the control mechanism failed and the core got so hot it caused an explosion and melted down through the plant into the earth.

    • 2 years ago
  14. JamesJ
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    Is unified field theory the base of string theory? No. The Greene book will explain the basis of String Theory.

    • 2 years ago
  15. Inopeki
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    If we were to "cancel" the strong force for a minuite, would all hell break lose? I mean, if the electromagnetic repulsion is constantly pressing the protons and neutrons away but keeps getting pushed in by the strong force, what would happen if we somehow just took away the strong force?

    • 2 years ago
  16. JamesJ
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    If we could turn a switch and the strong force stopped working, every atom in the universe would disintegrate. We would all be dead in a nanosecond, the earth would disintegrate and the sun would probably explode.

    • 2 years ago
  17. Inopeki
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    I see, so it would be like an infinite number of atomic bombs going off at the same time?

    • 2 years ago
  18. JamesJ
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    infinite, no. But a huge amount of energy would be liberated, yes.

    • 2 years ago
  19. Inopeki
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    Wait, how can the strong force be pulled towards the atom nucleus? There must be something special about it that makes it push it in from all sides.

    • 2 years ago
  20. JamesJ
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    Your question doesn't quite make sense. A good way to think about it is for protons and neutrons already in the nucleus, this is a lower energy state for the nucleus than one where any of the protons or neutrons move off. Think of it a bit like a collection of marbles sitting in the bottom of a cup. It doesn't take infinite energy for a marble to get out of the cup, but the marbles would rather stay where they are unless something gives them a big energy boost.

    • 2 years ago
  21. UnkleRhaukus
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    Theoretically you can have muonic circuits and muonic current.

    • 2 years ago
  22. Inopeki
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    Is there something special about those?

    • 2 years ago
  23. Inopeki
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    Oh, i see, james

    • 2 years ago
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