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mitosuki Group Title

Someone help in attachment!

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. mitosuki Group Title
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    Help!

    • 2 years ago
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  2. Dakota_Smith Group Title
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    from the looks of it mate 3 looks plausible

    • 2 years ago
  3. Dakota_Smith Group Title
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    i am srry 4 looks right

    • 2 years ago
  4. mitosuki Group Title
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    how do u figure?

    • 2 years ago
  5. Dakota_Smith Group Title
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    well the fourth one has not reached its point at the time usually when u emitting light it has its own point before showing.

    • 2 years ago
  6. Dakota_Smith Group Title
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    and the red didnt show

    • 2 years ago
  7. mitosuki Group Title
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    with longer frequencies you cant go near red, thats one of the options

    • 2 years ago
  8. Dakota_Smith Group Title
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    yes but i am no expert so i am just throwing my 2 cents you might want to check back when JamesJ is back online he as almost all answers but you could be right .

    • 2 years ago
  9. Dakota_Smith Group Title
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    but you never know

    • 2 years ago
  10. Jemurray3 Group Title
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    This question is absurd. Those curves give the continuous spectra of electromagnetic radiation emitted by black bodies (like stars) as a function of temperature (each of the four curves represents a different temperature). Stars don't have particular wavelengths, and EVERY star emits light of ALL wavelengths. The only thing that changes from star to star is which wavelength of light is emitted most intensely. This is usually referred to as the peak wavelength or wavelength of maximum emission. Even if we assume that THAT's what they mean when they say "the star of long/short wavelength" (which still makes me cringe), the answers STILL don't make sense because regardless of a star's temperature it still emits radiation of all wavelengths, and that's reflected by the fact that the curves are not sharp peaks, but rather are gently sloping and quite wide (at least with respect to the visible spectrum) so to say that ANY of those curves represent stars that don't emit radiation in some particular part of the visible spectrum is ridiculous. There's nothing I hate more than questions designed for beginning students that don't make any form of realistic sense to people who know the subject well. But now that I've got that out of my system, I think we can probably assume that what they mean to say is that "The star whose PEAK wavelength is ______ does not emit the MAJORITY of its radiation in the ________ part of the visible spectrum" in which case the best (but still not by any means good) answer is the fourth one.

    • 2 years ago
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spraguer (Moderator)
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is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

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