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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Will a solid metal sphere hold a larger elaectric charge than a hollow sphere of the same diameter?Where does the charge reside in each case?

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  1. ash2326
    • 5 years ago
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    No, they can store the same amount of charge In hollow sphere the charge will reside on the surface. In case of solid sphere it will be distributed evenly throughout

  2. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    Not quite ... even with the solid sphere, all the charge will be on the surface. The intuition for this is simply that each of the free electrons want to get as far away as possible from the other free electrons, and the the best way to do that is to go the surface.

  3. Shayaan_Mustafa
    • 5 years ago
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    I every case charge reside on the surface of the sphere either hollow or solid. If you want to know more then read the topic named "Gaussian surface" Regards Electronics engineer.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Sure surface, but strength is not affected with a hollow sphere? I think solid spheres would be stronger. For an electromagnetic sphere, I would be more certain an iron core would make some different on power.

  5. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    The questions are: "Will a solid metal sphere hold a larger electric charge than a hollow sphere of the same diameter? Where does the charge reside in each case?" The answers are respectively: No, they can hold the same charge; the charge resides on the surface. This lecture is good on this topic: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02-electricity-and-magnetism-spring-2002/video-lectures/lecture-5-electrostatic-shielding-faraday-cage/ The question of where charge goes for a solid is addressed explicitly beginning around 20:00.

  6. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    For a slightly more elementary treatment dealing only with spheres, see this earlier lecture: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02-electricity-and-magnetism-spring-2002/video-lectures/lecture-3-electric-flux-and-gausss-law/

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