Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

abdul_shabeer

  • 2 years ago

If a^x=b^y=c^z and b^2=ac, then (1/x)+(1/y) is

  • This Question is Closed
  1. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so you want that in terms of a and b and c?

  2. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    and z?

  3. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    In terms of y

  4. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (a) 2/y (b) 1/y (c) 1/2y (d) 2y

  5. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    2/y

  6. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can you explain?

  7. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Sure I can, tell me have you tried taking logarithms?

  8. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No, I don't think this question should be solved by logarithms

  9. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    How do you think we should solve it? Are do you have any thoughts? Or is this a test for us?

  10. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I had this doubt from a book, under the topic algebra.

  11. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    how did they do it?

  12. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    or they didn't?

  13. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No solution

  14. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    i want to see ffm's explanation :)

  15. vicky007
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Is the question 1/x+1/z ? then it is 2/y

  16. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Okay without logarithms, Set \( a^x = b^y = c^z = k \) Then, \( a = k^{1/x}, b = k^{1/y}, c = k^{1/z} \) Given \( b^2 = ac \). So, \( (k^{1/y} )^2 = \( k^{1/x} \times k^{1/z} \) \( \Rightarrow k^{2/y} = k^{ (1/x) + (1/z)} \) Hence, 2/y = (1/x) + (1/z) QED ;)

  17. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thanks ffm

  18. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    we wanted 1/x+1/y though you have 1/x+1/z....?

  19. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Glad to help :) and my apologies for the buggy Latex :(

  20. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    am I missing something?

  21. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sorry, it's (1/x)+(1/z)

  22. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ah, then FFM has done it again :D

  23. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    lol, it's was pretty obvious, also it's a typical JEE problem :D

  24. TuringTest
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what's JEE ?

  25. vicky007
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @FFM are you an IIT aspirant?

  26. vicky007
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so now you are an iitian. I am writing the test this year

  27. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Turing, all of this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JEE

  28. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Except the last J2EE.

  29. abdul_shabeer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    This question was in a eigth grade book

  30. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Lol, great :)

  31. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    That implies I am smarter than a 8 grader ? :P

  32. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    lol i thought it weird to have a y in the expression to start with

  33. myininaya
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    nice job ffm :)

  34. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 5

    Thanks myin :)

  35. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.