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RahulZ

  • 4 years ago

What is Malloc ?

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  1. opiesche
    • 4 years ago
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    Memory Alloc - allocate a block of memory, normally from the heap.

  2. lauriy
    • 4 years ago
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    Use it thusly to avoid problems: malloc(sizeof(mystruct))

  3. RahulZ
    • 4 years ago
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    hmmm i need a appropiate answer

  4. Toolan
    • 4 years ago
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    If you need a place to store some data, malloc is your friend. You can (M)emory (Alloc)ate some RAM to use to store it. If your program ends, or you (dealloc)ate it, then it's gone.

  5. lauriy
    • 4 years ago
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    Malloc is a function in some programming languages (most notably C) that allocates a certain number of bytes to hold some data structure?

  6. shadowfiend
    • 4 years ago
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    What do you mean by an appropriate answer..?

  7. sukun007
    • 4 years ago
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    WEll, malloc is the c equivalent of new. With m alloc you can allocate a chunk of memory at runtime and since it's allocated at runtime it's obviously stored in a heap. So you can do something like take input from user and create an array of that size int * k = malloc(sizeof(int[n]); It returns a pointer to the memory location and you have to free the memory before the program ends.

  8. rsmith6559
    • 4 years ago
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    I would consider new to be a wrapper of malloc.

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