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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Could I find the two missing angle measures if I know some of the side lengths of a right triangle?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    some means more than 1, right?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah, I'm pretty sure

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then with sine, cosine, tangent, you can find the angles

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, by using SAS congruents and those stuff. like.. a^2 = b^2 + c^2 -2ab Cos A

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im not really sure how to use them to find the angles instead of the other way around

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    a^2 = b^2 + c^2 -2ab Cos A

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    But if you know it's a right triangle, you don't use the cosine law

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Better only use a² + b² = c²

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Got it?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that'll help me find the sides, but i need the angles

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sine theta = opposite/ hypotenuse cosine theta = adjacent / hypotenuse tangent theta = opposite/ adjacent

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Pythagorean theorem does not help to find angles

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so how do i use the trigonometric ratios to find the angles if i only know the right angle?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im still confused xD

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then you use inverse sine/cosine/tangent

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay, how do i use those? im a bit new at this

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The sum of the interior angles of a triangle are equal to 180 degree. To find the third angle of a triangle when the other two angles are known subtract the number of degrees in the other two angles from 180 degree :)

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i understand that, but i only know the 90 degree angle

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Let me show you the example so that you will get it better. :)

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    @sweetrascal That has nothing to do with this

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Example: How many degrees are in the third angle of a triangle whose other two angles are 40degree and 65degree ? Answer: 180degree - 40degree -65degree = 75degree

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i only know the 90 degree angle... that's not what im looking for

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\sin \theta = \frac{1}{2}\]\[\sin^{-1}\sin \theta = \sin^{-1} \frac{1}{2} \implies \theta = \sin^{-1} \frac{1}{2}\]

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Moneybird will help you further :)

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hmm

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so both sides are multiplied by the inverse sine?

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    not multiplied on your calculator there is a inverse sine buton

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay, i get it! thank you!

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