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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Completely factor this expression (and show your work too): 128x^7y + 32x^4y^4 + 2xy^7

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[128x ^{7}y + 32x^4y^4 + 2xy^7\]

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[2xy(64x ^{6}+16x ^{3}y ^{3}+y ^{6})\]

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes i got there but it can be simplified further I'm pretty sure

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It can't since 1 is the lowest factor in there and it is already simplified at 1, the same goes for the lowest exponent of 1 (x,y)

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You're all set.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Are you sure?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes because if you look at the remaining 2, it goes into 64 and 16, but not 1, which is the y to the sixth. You can't reduce any exponents either because the 128 has an x with an exponent of 1, and the 2 has a y with an exponent of 1. Hope that helps.!

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    My mistake, I meant the 128 has a y with an exponent of 1

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'll go with what you say because I don't know otherwise

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Trust me on this one, that is simplified to it's fullest content.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=128x%5E7y+%2B+32x%5E4y%5E4+%2B+2xy%5E7+ Look at alternate forms, and look at the middle one. You could use the other forms but they are just moved a little.

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh, i think you are wrong, what about 2x(8x^3 + y^3)^2

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, you could use that, but they are both simplified.

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i need the completely simplified version though, as the question states

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I know, I have taken tests with very similar questions and I wrote the middle one and it was correct. Whatever your preference may be, pick one.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i think what i wrote last can be simplified further, any help?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The one with 2xy in the front?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Well, technically, the \[2xy(64x^6+16x^3y^3+y^6)\] can be simplified to \[2xy(8x^3+y^3)^2\] because if you square \[8x^3+y^3\] you will get 64x^6, then if you keep foiling you will get the original question. Sorry I'm really slow at the equation thing :/

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its okay, i think 8x^3 + y^3 can be further factored

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It can't, since there is an x and y. If they were both the same variable, then yes, but no here.

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Oh wait!

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm thinking you haven't taken algebra 2 yet or at least where I am, because you cannot automatically say that it is prime just because the variables are different

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm in it now

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    does factor theorem apply here?

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It is a perfect cube trinomial so It can be simplified to \[(2x+y)^3\]

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it doesnt work that way, try multiply that back out and see if you get the same answer

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Oh yeah I JUST realized that, god what a dumb mistake.

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its okay. do you know synthetic division?

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No, but look, there are no alternate forms: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=%282x%2By%29%5E3

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i typed in 8x^3 + y^3 and it gave me the fully factored form: (2x + y)(4x^2 - 2xy + y^2)

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I guess, I'm not as far as you though haha, besides I'm only in 8th grade :P

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm in 8th grade algebra 2

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    probably different books, we have a book with a picture of another book on the front of it

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Mine has a picture of some chick diving for a volley ball, lol. It's made by Glencoe

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Well, i gotta go. It's eleven and im sleepy

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Me too, even though I'm finishing up a report due tomorrow (I usually never do this)

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Good bye

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