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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Compute the average number of heads from the ten trials (add up the number of heads and divide it by 10). Change this to the average probability of tossing heads by putting the average number of heads in a fraction over the number of coins you used in your tosses. Did anything surprising or unexpected happen in your results for this experiment? Write the sample space for the outcomes of tossing three coins using H for heads and T for tails. What is the probability for each of the outcomes? Which kind of probability are we using here? How come we do not need to have three actual coins to

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    See where i got stuck

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    not really. i did a project jut like this except on genetics. where did u get stuck??

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    5 0 tinkerbell1980 Compute the average number of heads from the ten trials (add up the number of heads and divide it by 10). Change this to the average probability of tossing heads by putting the average number of heads in a fraction over the number of coins you used in your tosses. Did anything surprising or unexpected happen in your results for this experiment? Write the sample space for the outcomes of tossing three coins using H for heads and T for tails. What is the probability for each of the outcomes? Which kind of probability are we using here? How come we do not need to have three actual coins to

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry about the numbers im a little tired but i have to get this in

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i understand. i shall do my best to help you.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    your welcome. so how many H and T did u get total?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    there is my discussion to give the main idea of where i am

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it wont let me c it

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    In your own words, describe two main differences between classical and empirical probabilities. The difference between classical and empirical. The classical probability also assumes all the outcomes which are favorable to the reoccurrence. Empirical is based on the observed by frequencies. Gather coins you find around your home or in your pocket or purse. You will need an even number of coins (any denomination) between 16 and 30. You do not need more than that. Put all of the coins in a small bag or container big enough to allow the coins to be shaken around. Shake the bag well and empty the coins onto a table. Tally up how many heads and tails are showing. Do ten repetitions of this experiment, and record your findings every time. Shake Heads Tails 1 6 10 2 8 8 3 9 7 4 9 7 5 6 10 6 7 9 7 8 7 8 9 7 9 7 9 10 12 4   I used 16 coins The formula that I used was P (E) Observed Frequency of Specific event (f) = f Sum of Frequency n In my first count the probability of tossing a head was: 6/16=3/8 In my first count the probability of tossing a tail was: 10/16=5/8

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    10 8 7 7 10 9 7 7 9 4

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats the tails

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for tails its 7.8

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    they are asking for just the heads

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    head is 8.1

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is that the average

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats it added and divided im working on the average. so that i feel like im helping u and not jut giving u the answer what did u learn about average? any specific things?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i hate to be a pain but i have to see the work cause i have to show my work even on a discussion

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what did u learn about averages? i'll how u the work. and sorry if im a little slow at helping but im in the middle of an exam and a 90 point assignment.

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    show*

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    we just started the average so this is my first turn around it

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you haven't learned anything about it?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nope

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    to find an average you add all your numbers together and then divide it by the amount of numbers you added. i did do your T for example. 10 + 8 + 7 + 7 + 10 + 9 + 7 + 7 + 9 + 4 = 78 now you count how many number you added together(which is ten) 78 ÷ 10 = 7.8 Therefore your average of T - 7.8 is that easier to understand?

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So what i need to do is add all my heads #'s toger

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    after doing that i get 78

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    7.8 after dividing it

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the H average is 8.1 6 + 8 + 9 + 9 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 + 7 + 12 = 81 divide 81 by the number of numbers you added together(which is ten) 81 ÷ 10 = 8.1 Therefore your average for H i 8.1

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes. you got it! (: did i help you to better understand this?

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes but here is the instuctors example

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    6 of my repetitions came out to have exactly the same number of heads and tails This did not happen every time because the outcomes occur and random. I am using empirical probability The average number of heads came out to be 11.8% 10+14+14+11+13+5+10+13+17+11=118/10= 11.8% The average probability of getting heads is 59% 11.8/20=59% I turned out that 59% of the time, the coin fell on heads. I thought that was very interesting because I expected it to be more equal, The sample space for the outcomes of 3 coins are: · HHH, TTT, HHT, TTH, HTH, THT, THH, HTT 1 8 · We are using the classical probability

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now you see why im a little confused

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so you need percentages?

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yup

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    easy

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    remember what I just taught you?

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you are going to have to bare with me im also sick with the flu

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    take each average average. let do 7.8 so i dont confuse you 7.8 ÷ 20 = 39% 8.1 8.1 ÷ 20 = 405%

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i know it doesnt look right. but it is. all you do is tak your average and divide that by 20.

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no way! mee too!!! i had high fever all day yesterday! and its fine! i know how it is trying to do things that you dont understand in a deadline im jut glad i could help you(:

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can you show me where i am supose to put the numbers

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i have over 102 for the past 4 days and my vision is blurry

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i had 103 yesterday and was throwing up all day. and put what numbers where?

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    6 of my repetitions came out to have exactly the same number of heads and tails This did not happen every time because the outcomes occur and random. I am using empirical probability The average number of heads came out to be 11.8% was my next step

  48. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the bad thing is i have 12 different kinds of seziures

  49. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh im sorry :( i hope u get better soon! and i dont understand the above :/ what are you talking about?

  50. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    In your own words, describe two main differences between classical and empirical probabilities. Gather coins you find around your home or in your pocket or purse. You will need an even number of coins (any denomination) between 16 and 30. You do not need more than that. Put all of the coins in a small bag or container big enough to allow the coins to be shaken around. Shake the bag well and empty the coins onto a table. Tally up how many heads and tails are showing. Do ten repetitions of this experiment, and record your findings every time. State how many coins you have and present your data in a table or chart. Consider just your first count of the tossed coins. What is the observed probability of tossing a head? Of tossing a tail? Show the formula you used and reduce the answer to lowest terms. Did any of your ten repetitions come out to have exactly the same number of heads and tails? How many times did this happen? How come the answers to the step above are not exactly ½ and ½? What kind of probability are you using in this “bag of coins” experiment? Compute the average number of heads from the ten trials (add up the number of heads and divide it by 10). Change this to the average probability of tossing heads by putting the average number of heads in a fraction over the number of coins you used in your tosses. Did anything surprising or unexpected happen in your results for this experiment? Write the sample space for the outcomes of tossing three coins using H for heads and T for tails. What is the probability for each of the outcomes? Which kind of probability are we using here? How come we do not need to have three actual coins to compute the probabilities for these outcomes? Respond to at least two of your classmates’ postings. Make sure you review their data and calculations and let them know if their probabilities seem accurate.

  51. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that is the instuctions on how she wants it to be placed

  52. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Change this to the average probability of tossing heads by putting the average number of heads in a fraction over the number of coins you used in your tosses. how many coins did u use?

  53. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    16

  54. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The sample space for the outcomes of 3 coins are: · HHH, TTT, HHT, TTH, HTH, THT, THH, HTT 1 8 · We are using the classical probability here she is saying all the possible outcomes

  55. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    In my first count the probability of tossing a head was: 6/16=3/8

  56. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok. can u simplify that fraction anymore?

  57. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    3/8

  58. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can u simplify 3/8 any further?

  59. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no

  60. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then that i your final answer

  61. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    In my first count the probability of tossing a tail was: 10/16=5/8

  62. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no 5/8 w as i can go

  63. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i got confused after that

  64. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    5/8 is your final answer. is cant be simplified anymore

  65. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it is the steps after that i get confused

  66. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no more steps. that the final fraction

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