anonymous
  • anonymous
integrate 1/((x^5)*sqrt(9*x^2-1))
Mathematics
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
See more answers at brainly.com
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

anonymous
  • anonymous
I got stuck on this one again. Posted most of my answer here http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/4f18fdcce4b04992dd21eed4
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
Bookmark* It drives me crazy when I see the 'for restricted values of x' thing on wolf, I often have no idea where it comes from. I hope you find out.
anonymous
  • anonymous
it's frustrating because I am so close!

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

TuringTest
  • TuringTest
The other day I had some indefinite integration that came up as (blah blah) + constant then it said 'which is equivalent to restricted values of x for' (blah blah) + 1/4 + constant Neither myininaya or I could figure why they needed to specify a constant in restricted values of x for an indefinite integral, so I want to see if I can figure that out through this. I follow everything up to that point here as well.
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1327042249104:dw| are these restrictions from my notes of any help?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright thankfully it wasn't actually an indefinite integral so I bypassed the substitution and converted the upper and lower limits into the u. It gets the correct answer this way. I'm still not sure what the meaning of the restricted x is though. If you ever find it out let me know too!
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
No, my problem was completely different. It was a basic, straightforward integral with no trig sub needed. I just don't see why you would ever have a constant term present in an indefinite integral when it can be combined with the integration constant.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.