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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

integrate 1/((x^5)*sqrt(9*x^2-1))

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I got stuck on this one again. Posted most of my answer here http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/4f18fdcce4b04992dd21eed4

  2. TuringTest
    • 5 years ago
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    Bookmark* It drives me crazy when I see the 'for restricted values of x' thing on wolf, I often have no idea where it comes from. I hope you find out.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it's frustrating because I am so close!

  4. TuringTest
    • 5 years ago
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    The other day I had some indefinite integration that came up as (blah blah) + constant then it said 'which is equivalent to restricted values of x for' (blah blah) + 1/4 + constant Neither myininaya or I could figure why they needed to specify a constant in restricted values of x for an indefinite integral, so I want to see if I can figure that out through this. I follow everything up to that point here as well.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327042249104:dw| are these restrictions from my notes of any help?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Alright thankfully it wasn't actually an indefinite integral so I bypassed the substitution and converted the upper and lower limits into the u. It gets the correct answer this way. I'm still not sure what the meaning of the restricted x is though. If you ever find it out let me know too!

  7. TuringTest
    • 5 years ago
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    No, my problem was completely different. It was a basic, straightforward integral with no trig sub needed. I just don't see why you would ever have a constant term present in an indefinite integral when it can be combined with the integration constant.

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