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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

An object with mass M moving North with speed V strikes an identical object with mass M moving East with speed V. Assuming a perfectly inelastic collision, what is the speed of either objects after collision what i did: mv+mv/ 2m = v but that's wrong... so i dont know what to do

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is the speed root of 2M?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    v / rt 2

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    WAT IS r?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    v / sqrt 2

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327070380181:dw|in this case only momentum conservation can be applied as kinectic energy is not conserved

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that gives the initial momentum

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327070682895:dw|final momentum=M(vel+vel) as vel of both are same after collision

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how come KE isnt conserved?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    because inelastic collision involves lose of mechanical energy(k.e or p.e) it may be converted to some other form of energy like heat

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ohhhh, but in elastic collision, energy is conserved?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    YA IT IS CONSERVED

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    remember ENERGY IS ALWAYS SAME ONLY TRANSFERRED FRM ONE FORM TO ANOTHER

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay, got it, thanks! how did you get m(v+v) ?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i thought momentum conservation was m1v1 + m2v2 = m1v1f + m2v2f

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ya that is wat i did here

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    initial momentum=final momentum

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how did you get v sqrt 2?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    OHHHHHH

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    NEVERMIND!!!! i get it, thanks sooo much again, you seriously helped a lot, especially since my final is in 1 hour...

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do you know when momentum is conserved?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    when no external force acts here and in all collisions there is no external force in the system just transfer of enegy

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so all collisions have its momentum conserved? even with a block attached to a spring and another block collides and sticks to it?

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes there it is plastic collision as the block sticks to the other just look for initial and final cases after collision ask urself is there only the initial force thta was given acting? thats it

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what does the answer to the question mean?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    when a body starts to move then it hits some other body,u just considert whether there is any external force acting on these bodies other than the initial force that was given for those bodies to move....

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    does air resistance count as an external force? last thing, i swear! how do you know when to use momentum conservation and energy and which to use first?

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes air resistance is an external force

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for elastic collisions momentum and energy conserved for inelastic only momentum is conserved

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay, i think i got it now. thank you so much again! i really appreciate it!

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no problem ALL THE BEST!

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