anonymous
  • anonymous
You bring a negatively charged rubber rod close to a grounded conductor without touching it. Then you disconnect the ground. What is the sign of the charge on the conductor after you remove the charged rod?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1327077983996:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
so positve
anonymous
  • anonymous
sweet dude...thanks a ton

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anonymous
  • anonymous
http://regentsprep.org/Regents/physics/phys03/aeleclab/induct.htm
anonymous
  • anonymous
"Electroscope ends up oppositely charged to the object used to charge it."
anonymous
  • anonymous
options are, negative, positive, no charge, and cannot be determined from given information
anonymous
  • anonymous
cannot be determined from given information because we don't know initial state of conducter
anonymous
  • anonymous
i got a question added to it cause i got one wrong...u care to do another if i make the post?
anonymous
  • anonymous
sure, why not
JamesJ
  • JamesJ
This is classic example of induction. To see others in action, watch this beginning around minute 7: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02-electricity-and-magnetism-spring-2002/video-lectures/lecture-1-what-holds-our-world-together/
anonymous
  • anonymous
This animation is good too http://www.physicsclassroom.com/mmedia/estatics/isop.gif
JamesJ
  • JamesJ
Nice
JamesJ
  • JamesJ
@sonofa: following up from the conversation on your other question, the answer here is the change in charge on the conductor is positive. It has to be, because the charge induced in the conductor is positive, as per the original diagram imran drew.
anonymous
  • anonymous
excellent
JamesJ
  • JamesJ
meet me in chat for a minute

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