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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

You bring a negatively charged rubber rod close to a grounded conductor without touching it. Then you disconnect the ground. What is the sign of the charge on the conductor after you remove the charged rod?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327077983996:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so positve

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sweet dude...thanks a ton

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://regentsprep.org/Regents/physics/phys03/aeleclab/induct.htm

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    "Electroscope ends up oppositely charged to the object used to charge it."

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    options are, negative, positive, no charge, and cannot be determined from given information

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    cannot be determined from given information because we don't know initial state of conducter

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i got a question added to it cause i got one wrong...u care to do another if i make the post?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sure, why not

  10. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    This is classic example of induction. To see others in action, watch this beginning around minute 7: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02-electricity-and-magnetism-spring-2002/video-lectures/lecture-1-what-holds-our-world-together/

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    This animation is good too http://www.physicsclassroom.com/mmedia/estatics/isop.gif

  12. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    Nice

  13. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    @sonofa: following up from the conversation on your other question, the answer here is the change in charge on the conductor is positive. It has to be, because the charge induced in the conductor is positive, as per the original diagram imran drew.

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    excellent

  15. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    meet me in chat for a minute

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