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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

I was writing for my english 091 and I ran into a question that i am getting mixed answers on. I was quoting the name of the article I was writing about and it ended in a question mark. Something like this.... In the NPR article "Gone to Far?" and so on... now since I was continuing my sentence would i put a comma after the ? or after the " or not at all?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It seems to be not at all because we normally don't put a comma after the when quoting the name of an article.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You mean, you have this situation, yes? In the NPR article "Gone Too Far?," . . . . Yes, put in the comma as required by the syntax of your sentence, tucked in before the close quote. That's American style, at any rate. Not British.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Girl, you said you were quoting the name of the article you were writing about and it ended in a question mark. So, if you put a comma after the question mark, it means the question mark is not the end of the name of the article. Am I right?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The question mark is part of the name of the article. The comma is part of the syntax of the sentence. This is in American-style punctuation, not British. From _The Chicago Manual of Style_ 6.119 *Commas with question marks or exclamation points.* When a question mark or exclamation point appears at the end of a quotation where a comma would normally appear, the comma is omitted (as in the first example below; see also 6.52). When, however, the title of a work ends in a question mark or an exclamation point, a comma should also appear if the grammar of the sentence would normally call for one. <snip> Compare 6.118. See also 14.105, 14.178. "Are you a doctor?" asked Mahmoud. but . . . "Are you a Doctor?," the fifth story in Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?, treats modern love. All the band's soundtracks--A Hard Day's Night, Help!, Yellow Submarine, and Magical Mystery Tour--were popular. [Now, you have to imagine the title "Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?" in italics. Same thing with the song titles in the following sentence. Can't do italics in this window.] x-refs (1) 6.52 treats commas with questions when those questions are included within another sentence, directly or indirectly. Exs. Suddenly he asked himself, where am I headed? The question on everyone's mind was, how are we going to tell her? (2) 6.118 treats periods with question marks or exclamation points. The period (aside from an abbreviating period) never accompanies a question mark or an exclamation point. Exs. Their first question was a hard one: "Who is willing to trade oil for water?" What did she mean when she said, "The foot now wears a different shoe"? She owned two copies of Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? [Again, that last title would be in italics.] (3) 14.105 addresses question marks or exclamation points in book titles when citing those titles in notes and bibliographies. 14.178 addresses the same issue for article titles. _The Chicago Manual of Style_ is the style guide used throughout the publishing industry, from trade books to scholarly works, as well as throughout much of the business world. I have worked in a corporate context for the last twenty years, and it is always _Chicago_ that forms the base for house style. I am not sure how MLA or APA style -- used for papers and theses within the university context -- treats this issue. My copy of the MLA Handbook (6th ed, so one level off) does not address this issue, citing only the case of a closing quotation mark in a piece of text that appears in the sentence as dialogue, with various verbs of "saying."

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thanks, Stanfordian! I got what you meant. I love American style.

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