anonymous
  • anonymous
How do I develop good handwriting?
Writing
chestercat
  • chestercat
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jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Who uses handwriting anymore? They don't even teach it in grade school anymore, which I find rather sad, but I understand. When it comes down to it, in this day, which is more important; learning handwriting or learning to use a keyboard?
anonymous
  • anonymous
True :(
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Kinda wish there was more focus on the keyboard when I was young, I would certainly be able to type faster and better than I do now. Of course, when I was in grade school they didn't even have electric typewriters.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Buy yourself a fountain pen or make a few nibs. This will make you much more careful and give you a steadier hand - no more booze - both necessary for good handwriting. then methinks some calligraphy basics to get you going.
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
I love calligraphy, but I suck. lol
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
I don't have the patience ot the time to really get good at it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
That's OK, I think it helps to keep the nib clean but not so good for the tongue.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm hoping to become ambidextrous someday.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I try to write at least 40 left-handed "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" every day
anonymous
  • anonymous
Quick draw MacGraw.
anonymous
  • anonymous
it impresses ladies
anonymous
  • anonymous
Enough! Time to prepare for the day. Cheers
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
I suppose one could practice and become ambidextrous, but most are just born that way. I knew a girl in high school that was not only ambidextrous, but she could write two different sentences at the same time and she could write one sentence with the left starting at the beginning and the right starting at the end and writing backwards and meet in the middle. It was frickin' amazing.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I couldn't multitask like that :(
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
She should have been on that old 70's show "That's Incredible".
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
She was cute to boot. An exchange student from Japan.
anonymous
  • anonymous
On the other hand, and back to the original question and jag's response, I heard something the other day about what the move *away* from handwriting -- and more work with the hands in general, not only in school but in play -- means for young children. Impedes their long-term intellectual development and, in particular, the ability to problem-solve. Somehow, movement is related to thinking. The brain develops better when during its development the child is doing a lot of physical exploring of his environment, and a lot of moving, large muscles and small. So, jagatuba, you should count yourself lucky that when you were growing up, you got all that rich feedback from your environment. Brain food.
anonymous
  • anonymous
That actually makes a lot of sense. One more reason to become ambidextrous!
anonymous
  • anonymous
True! :)
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Oh I certainly do. I was merely stating that I wish I was a better typist. It's difficult to improve this skill the older you are. Learning at an early age is much easier. Just look at bi-lingual children as evidence. I still wish they had keyboarding when I was in grade school.
anonymous
  • anonymous
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anonymous
  • anonymous
No, no, that's true. I wish I could type faster and more efficiently myself. I also wish that I had grown up speaking two (or more!) languages. And I wish I had focused more on school when I was a teen. :/ I was really just jumping off into a tangent, and used the direct address to you in that context.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Has to do with the plasticity of the brain.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The brain is most "plastic" -- that is, most open to learning, most able to make new connections -- in I think it's the first two years of life and then again at adolescence.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm still a young adolescent.... can I still become a polyglot?
anonymous
  • anonymous
The brains of teenagers actually grow and develop, changing their very structure, in relationship to the environment. Turns out, what you're involved in at that age is really, really important.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont thnk so agdgdgdgwngo. I´m older but I feel more exciting about my life now.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well, language learning is a special case. Yes, of course you can, but you will have to work at it in a way that were you a toddler, you would not. Very young children have brains that are somehow set up to learn language at an amazing rate, and in a way that for most of us is never again possible.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So that means that I will be smarter than my present self next year? That's one new year's resolution down!
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
The other thing is that as we get older we are not a patient. We want the shortcuts, which usually equate to bad habits that hamper learning how to really do it right.
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
*as
anonymous
  • anonymous
What you focus on, what you turn your attention to, what you think about -- all of these will affect your development. You should read . . . wait, let me go to that set of books. I'll get you some titles. You are so fortunate! I wish the state of brain science had been this when I was your age!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Wish I could go back in time and tell little George to stop tearing those language books :(
anonymous
  • anonymous
More older, more easier the things look to be. Do you remember how was hard to understand something and now the same one is straightforward? It is the effect of time on your brain. I´m sure you are better off now than ten years ago.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, you should consider reading _The Primal Teen_, by Barbara Strauch. It is very accessible. I found it a little annoying, because her writing is frequently loose and unfocused, and she repeats herself (the book needs an edit), *but* it's an easy easy read and it does get the point across. Then you should read _brain rules_ by John Medina. It could change your whole way of thinking about yourself.
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Oh yes, but coming about skills later in life is more difficult than when you are young. Even as little as a few years makes a huge difference. For example, my son didn't really like the water when he was very young, so we did not really encourage him to swim. Around 4 or so he started getting in the water but had a hard time learning to swim. He didn't even want to get his head wet. My daughter on the other hand had no fear of water and went under for the first time at six months old. They are five years apart and she learned to swim without assistance before he did.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh! And also _incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain_ by David Eagleman. Fantastic.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, friend. I think it means that everyone have your own time and our kids are a good exemple of this. My son is 2 years old and has some fears that his peers dont have.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The phrase"The firm was trading 96 times trailing earnings..." can I translate "trailing earnings" into "expected earnings"?
anonymous
  • anonymous
practice practice practice lol

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