sh3lsh
  • sh3lsh
What is the difference between double and single stranded RNA and the difference between positive and negative RNA (all relating to viruses)
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
sh3lsh
  • sh3lsh
Sorry. negative and positive sense RNA viruses
anonymous
  • anonymous
is rna also found in double stranded form too??/
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont think there is double stranded RNA.. where you get that from

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

sh3lsh
  • sh3lsh
Eh. I was ambiguous, I guess http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-stranded_RNA_viruses
anonymous
  • anonymous
In DNA it is called "sense" and "antisense" - this is just which way the DNA twists - like which way the thumb sticks out of your hand is based on which hand it is... the DNA in a nucleus that is "read" (transcribed) into mRNA is "antisense" and for this reason the mRNA that results (when the DNA is translated) is called "sense" -because it is like a backwards imprint... in viri (the "correct" Latin/scientific for "viruses") positive sense means that the viral RNA looks to the cell just like mRNA coming from the nucleus... so it can be *translated* (by the ribosome) into amino acid sequences used to make a protein... when a virus infects a cell, it will use one type of RNA or the other (if it is an RNA virus anyway) to get the cellular machinery (the ribosome) to make proteins that help the virus, and often harm the cell... if the virus releases negative sense RNA it has to be copied (and thus reversed) into positive sense RNA by a different cellular "machine" called RNA polymerase before the ribosome can read and thus translate it into aa sequence.
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 Attachment
sh3lsh
  • sh3lsh
Kamila and mehomonculus, you guys are awesome. Thanks so much.
anonymous
  • anonymous
your welcome my dear :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
a new thing for me to know thanQ to all of u guys.. :)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.