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pokemon23

  • 5 years ago

Anyone know how to solve compound circuits ? involving with the math

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Maybe give an example of what you are looking for?

  2. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    Hold on let me get my binder

  3. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327207626861:dw|

  4. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    like basically i know we have to combine like terms

  5. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    so final circuit will be

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Shouldn't it just be \[\frac1R=\frac{1}{R_1+R_2}+\frac1{R_3+R_4}+\frac1{R_5+R_6}\]

  7. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    exactly my point

  8. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    But I was wondering I took my exam on Friday and I was struggling on find the RT of this circuit

  9. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    I remember the numbers

  10. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327208223868:dw|

  11. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    The first thing I did was combine like term terms

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Mhm, giving you three parallel resistors of 36, 8 and 39 respectively (I believe those are your numbers, correct me if I'm wrong. Then you should get \[R_T=\frac1{\frac1{36}+\frac18+\frac1{39}}=\frac{936}{167}\]

  13. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    Basically i just couldn't figure out R3+r4

  14. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    and r5+r6

  15. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    for r1+r2 I got 9ohms

  16. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327208561762:dw|

  17. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    basically I'm in 9th grade

  18. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    right now where understanding the basics

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay, I believe you are confusing some of the laws of resistors. If two resistors are in sequence, then their total resistance is the sum of the two. Imagine it as if you're running through an obstacle course. The more obstacles (ie resistors) the harder it is (ie the more resistance to you finishing). On the other hand resistors in parallel use the inverse law, namely that if resistors A and B are in parellel, then the total resistance (R) is 1/R=1/A+1/B. Since current is just a flow of electrons and electrons want to minimize resistance, this law basically is the result of more electrons choosing the resistor with lower resistance. However, they can't ALL go through the smaller one, otherwise it would cause a jam of sorts, causing them to instead follow this law.

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thus, what you must do is first deal with the three sets of sequential resistors. Namely, find R_1+R_2=18+18=36, R_3+R_4=4+4=8, and R_5+R_6=13+23=36.

  21. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    omg -_-'

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Now, for all intents and purposes, you just have three resistors of resistance 36, 8, and 36 (I accidentally said 39 earlier, so ignore that).

  23. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    but why do you add 9+9

  24. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    i know we had to do this |dw:1327208987134:dw|

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Your final answer should come from the equation \[\frac1R=\frac1{R_1+R_2}+\frac1{R_3+R_4}+\frac1{R_5+R_6}\] so yes, you must do that several times. Plugging in those values will give you your answer.

  26. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    but why do you 9+9 and not use the parallel formula..?

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Oh sorry, I thought those were 4's, not 9's.

  28. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    its alright not your fought

  29. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    fault*

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So plugging those in, you get \[\frac1R=\frac1{36}+\frac1{18}+\frac1{36}=\frac19\] So your total resistance is 9 ohms :)

  31. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    ok that what i got :D

  32. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    now for r3+r4

  33. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    |dw:1327209449039:dw|

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    pokemon, 9 is the answer for the total resistance of the ENTIRE diagram. Once you solve for that 9, you are done.

  35. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    you serious

  36. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    my friend told me nine as well -_-

  37. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    I should had listen to him

  38. pokemon23
    • 5 years ago
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    nooooooooooooooo thanks again imperialist

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Haha, no problem pokemon. Glad to help :)

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