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unicorn

  • 5 years ago

emf of a battery means electromotive force ,does it actually a force ???? and what about potential and emf of cell are these are same thing or some thing else

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No, the electromotive force is not truly a force. It has units of energy per unit charge, or volts. EMF is more or less synonymous with voltage or potential difference.

  2. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    as far as i understood potential diff are generated by charge accumulated on the plates of battery which is actually conservative in nature and emf is not conservative as i know, then can you please explain how EMF is more or less synonymous with voltage or potential difference.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You are confusing a battery with a capacitor. They are very much not the same thing.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Additionally, conservative or nonconservative are terms that are used to describe a force and as stated above, an emf is not a force.

  5. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    emf as i know is work done by battery in carrying unit charge from one terminal to other and this work is done by force which an be conservative or non conservative then why not emf of battery cannot be related to the type of force which actually is doing this work to compare the two types of work

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Imagine that I have a projectile that I launch off a cliff with a slingshot. Now imagine I launch the same projectile using a rail gun, which utilizes electromagnetism. They are both traveling with the same speed, so the same amount of work has been done on them. How would I differentiate a conservative or nonconservative force from this?

  7. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry for late replying conservative force are that force that work on closed path is zero such as gravitational force or spring force suppose a man took a ball with him to the top of tower and then bring it back to ground then work done by gravity in entire trip is zero hope you understand how, a rail gun is consisting mainly of conducting metal rails, that uses electromagnetic force to accelerate a projectile to a much greater speed than that achieved by conventional chemical propellant weapons.once the particle are acclerated or given velocity the gravity come in effects which is actually conservative and in case of sling shot its also gravity so i hope you now understand how to figure out conservative and non conservative force

  8. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    hey sorry but who had given you medal for answering the question till now i haven't understand what you said or any of yours comments in this question does not seem to be helpful to me if the person who had given you medal for yours answer can explain what he trying to say if he/she had understood thanks in advance

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You do not understand what I'm asking you. I know very well the difference between conservative forces and nonconservative forces. What you are not understanding is that once work has been done on an object, there's no way to know what force did the work.

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I am attempting to be patient because I understand that there is likely something of a language barrier that needs to be overcome here. However, I reiterate that an EMF cannot be conservative or nonconservative. The EMF is generated by a force, and that force MAY be conservative or it may not, but the EMF itself cannot be labeled as such.

  11. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry once again for late answering now to the point i am not saying emf as conservative or non conservative at all as in some case emf comes out to be same as potential difference people think both are the same thing so i am trying to compare emf and pd as both of them are work in term of the force (which may be conservative or non conservative)which perform these work only to prove both are diff

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Can you please explain to me exactly why you think there is any difference at all between a potential difference of one volt and an emf of one volt?

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There is ambiguity in terminology insofar as some people say that the mechanism responsible for creating the a potential difference is the emf, while others equate the emf with the potential difference it creates. As you may have noticed, I have a tendency towards the latter, but it makes no difference.

  14. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    i will answer this question but before tell me one thing what is difference between a force of magnitude 2N ACTING in north direction and a velocity of 2 m/s in north both are same in magnitude and direction but they are not same at all according to vector algebra so it is in the case of emf and p.d

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    They're both arrows of the same length pointing straight up, so in terms of vector algebra they are the same, but are obviously very different because the units are completely different. That has absolutely nothing to do with this topic.

  16. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    two vectors are said to be equals if they have same mag , dir and represent same physical quantity here is some what similar situation both mag comes out to be same (emf and pd )but they are diff things

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    They have the same units!

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Look it is clear that there's nothing I can say that will have any influence on whether you think emf and potential difference are effectively the same thing. Speak to a professor if you'd like to clarify the point further.

  19. unicorn
    • 5 years ago
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    ok!!!!!!! but thanks for the the conversation after all

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