anonymous
  • anonymous
A normal line is a line perpendicular to a tangent line at the point where the tangent meets the function. Give the equation of the normal line to the graph of y=3xsqrt{x^2+6}+4 at the point (0,4)
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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TuringTest
  • TuringTest
so we're gonna need the calculus version of point-slope form y-y1=f'(x1)(x-x1) which means we need to find dy/dx (at x=x1) then we need the fact that the normal line to this line has the slope of the negative reciprocal -1/(f'(x1) between those facts you're good
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
so step one (as usual in calc) find dy/dx
anonymous
  • anonymous
so dy/dx = (3)(1/2(x^2+6)^-1/2(2x)

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anonymous
  • anonymous
or 6x/2(x^2+6)
anonymous
  • anonymous
or 3x/x^2+6
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
I hadn't tried yet, but that's not what I'm getting...
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh
anonymous
  • anonymous
i did the chain rule for sqrt{x^2+6}
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh so would it be 3x/sqrt{x^2+6}
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
Yeah, but you need to use it in conjunction with the product rul so be very careful... I even have messed up a little according to wolfram, so I'm looking where I lost a 2
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
that's closer^
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh would the 3x be part of sqrt{x^2+6} in the beginning
anonymous
  • anonymous
would i have to use the chain rule for (3xsqrt{x^2+6}) or just sqrt{x^2+6}
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
product then chain rule (3x)'(sqrt(x^2+6)+3x(sqrt(x^2+6))' ^^^^^^^^ chain rule here
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm i kinda got this for the product rule i used the chain rule in the product rule... 3(sqrt{x^2+6})+1/2(x^2+6)^-1/2(2x)(3x)
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
yeah, that looks good now the simplification is the annoying bit, I only just found my earlier mistake :/
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
simplify the obvious stuff then factor out (x^2+6)^(-1/2) with finess
anonymous
  • anonymous
dy/dx= 3sqrt{x^2+6}+6x^2/2sqrt{x^2+6}
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
well, you could just use a calculator I suppose... right what you have so far though, just a pain to evaluate
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
so you should keep going and simplify if you can
anonymous
  • anonymous
dy/dx= 3sqrt{x^2+6}+3x^2/sqrt{x^2+6}
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
you can factor out 3(x^2+6)^(-1/2) if you want to do it to look nice
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm how?
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
dy/dx=3(x^2+6)^(1/2)+3x^2(x^2+6)^(-1/2) =3(x^2+6)^(-1/2)(x^2+6+x^2)=3(2x^2+6)/sqrt(x^2+6) =6(x^2+3)/sqrt{x^2+6} watch the exponents carefully if that lost you
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
I have to go eat.... Evaluate that at x=0 to get the derivative at that point, which is your slope of the tangent f'(0) the slope perpendicular to that will be the normal slope, so that is the one you want. We know it will be -1/f'(0) from algebra. so use -1/f'(0) in the the slope m in the point-slope formula for a line y-y1=m(x-x1) See you later perhaps
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay thank you so much! have a great dinner :) thank you.

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