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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

when do i use sin, cos and tan in inverse form?

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  1. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    an example might be that you are told the sin of an angle is 0.5 and asked to find the angle. then you would use the inverse sin function.

  2. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    does that help?

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    so when looking for the sides of a triangle?

  4. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    when looking for sides, you usually use the sin/cos/tan functions. the inverses are usually used to find the angles.

  5. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    so you might be given an angle and one side, and asked to find another side - that involves using sin/cos/tan. on the other hand, you might be given 2 sides and asked to find the angle - that involves using the inverse functions.

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ohh ok... |dw:1327355865365:dw| how would i do this?

  7. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    \[\cos(60)=\frac{5}{x}\]therefore:\[x=\frac{5}{\cos(60)}\]

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    cosine is a/h?

  9. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    yes

  10. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    you can use the mneumonic SohCahToa to remember them. Soh ===> sin = o/h Cah ===> cos = a/h Toa ===> tan = o/a

  11. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    you pronounce it as "SAW CAH TOE AH"

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    when i have that e

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    equation set up.. how do you solve for the x tho?

  14. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    just work out the fraction - 5 divided by cosine of 60 degrees. I'm not sure where you are stuck?

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    sry.. i thought it was 5/x tho?

  16. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    ok - let me try to explain it step by step...

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    thank you im horrible at math

  18. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    ok, we know:\[\cos(60)=\frac{5}{x}\]are you happy with this statement?

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yes

  20. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    good. so 1st step is to get rid of the 'x' in the fraction on the right hand side. the way you do that is to multiply both sides by 'x' as follows:\[x*\cos(60)=x*\frac{5}{x}\]

  21. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    now, on the right hand side, the 'x' at the top and bottom of the fraction will cancel out to give you:\[x*\cos(60)=\cancel{x}*\frac{5}{\cancel{x}}=5\]

  22. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    follow it so far?

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yes!

  24. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    ok, so next step we want to do is to leave just 'x' on the left hand side. that can be done by dividing both sides by \(\cos(60)\) as follows:\[\frac{x*\cos(60)}{\cos(6)}=\frac{5}{\cos(60)}\]

  25. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    then you'll notice the \(\cos(60)\)'s on the left hand side cancel each other out to give you:\[\frac{x*\cancel{\cos(60)}}{\cancel{\cos(6)}}=\frac{5}{\cos(60)}\]\[x=\frac{5}{\cos(60)}\]

  26. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    make sense?

  27. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yea.. for that would you get...-5.24?

  28. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    \[\cos(60)=0.5\]so:\[x=\frac{5}{\cos(60)}=\frac{5}{0.5}=10\]

  29. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    maybe you entered 60 as radians instead of degrees in your calculator?

  30. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yup :)

  31. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    don't worry - we've all been there :)

  32. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    do u know how to find all sic trig functions...? lol

  33. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    sic?

  34. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    six*

  35. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    You might find this site useful: http://www.ping.be/~ping1339/gonio.htm

  36. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    okay

  37. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    best thing to do is to keep practicing and post a question in this group when you get stuck on a particular problem. there are MANY people here who will be more than willing to spend time explaining things to you.

  38. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    okay thank you for helping

  39. asnaseer
    • 4 years ago
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    yw

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