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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

the earth accelerates and deaccelerates every year, why don't we feel it

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  1. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    Calculate the rate of acceleration/deceleration and I'd bet it's quite low. Let me know what you find. If it's high (e.g., greater than 0.5 m/s^2, then that would be interesting.

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • 5 years ago
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    We are accelerating with the earth, we fell nothing because with respect to the earth we are not accelerating

  3. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    But you can imagine that if the earth itself accelerated and decelerated with a very high magnitude vector, that could be significant for us.

  4. UnkleRhaukus
    • 5 years ago
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    forces that effect the earth will effect us with the same magnitude, wont they/?

  5. UnkleRhaukus
    • 5 years ago
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    i cannot imagine an even that would result in a different direction for downward force, unless it is a epic collision

  6. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes. And if the size of those forces is great compared to the gravitational force that we feel, then we might noticeably accelerate in a direction other than radially down. But the fact that we don't tells us that that acceleration from the elliptical orbit of the earth is really very small in magnitude. It would be interesting to know what it is.

  7. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    Imagine you were standing on a comet the came in from beyond Neptune and Pluto, flew close to the sun and on its way back out. You can imagine that you could get thrown off in that turn around the sun, because the gravity from the comet would be very small compared to the size of that other force, and that other force would be sufficiently large in magnitude.

  8. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    (or has this G&T gone to my head?)

  9. UnkleRhaukus
    • 5 years ago
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    the example with the comet is different to the example in the question, but i can seethis force would effect our gravitational acceleration can you imagining a giant pendulum that is sensitive enough to indicate our position in orbit

  10. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes

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