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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

What is the third perfect number? Please help me understand how it works. thnx

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  1. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    1^2 = 1 2^2 = 4 3^2 = 9 The third perfect number is 9? Did you mean perfect SQUARES?

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ohh, no, ummm, like the first number is 6, the second is 28, and idk what the third is...plus idk how to get the number

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Aperfect number is a positive integer that is equal to the sum of its proper positive divisors. Mathematically, \( \sigma_1(N)=2N \) \(\sigma_1() \) is the divisor function ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divisor_function) Here is the list of perfect numbers in OEIS: http://oeis.org/A000396

  4. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Never heard of it

  5. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    And fool clearly wiki'd it

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    A year back I wrote a very optimized perfect number generator.

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    whoa, did you code it all?

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Unfortunately it's a part of an algorithm contest, so I can't share the code here. But I can give some hints if you want :)

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Hero, I don't really need to wike perfect numbers :)

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes please, any that are available :) I just started coding a few days ago and I'm working through the Python textbook. Just started my first more complex code (finding slope and y-intercept)still very simple, but I'd appreciate it

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Okay first there are no odd perfect numbers (this is not proven yet) so you can clearly ignore the odd numbers.

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ok

  13. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Why am I just now hearing about perfect numbers? In what course do you usually learn about them?

  14. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    14yamaka, what course are you currently taking?

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Now, you need to have a very fast \( \sigma_1(N) \) for that you need to have a fast optimized prime generator. This is actually deep I have used Miller Rabin algorithm.

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    @Hero: Elementary Number theory.

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    14yamaka, I would probably advice you to be satisfied with typical brute-force at this stage :)

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    *This is actually deep, I have used Miller Rabin algorithm + sieve.

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    wow, ok, I gotta read up on this Miller Rabin algorithm. and sieve. Thanks for the explanation. Both of you :)

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Fain I help :)

  21. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    I didn't provide anything, lol FFM provided everything

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