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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

if i could some assistance with this problem that would be great...

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    4 (l'hospitals rule)

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you very much

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  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you tried it and it worked out?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    we havnt done hospitals rule yet,and i looked it yup and you take the derivative of that of both functions right?

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  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah...take derivative of top and bottom separetly. use the same limit and evaluate. if it still tends to infinity then you can rinse repeat until it converges to a limit

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay im still very new to derivatives(we learned them slightly in physics) but the the derivative of the function X-1 equals 0 because the derivative of the x=1 and if i rewrite the bottom as (x-3)^-1/2 and take the take the derivative of that i get 2(x-3)^2-1 which i simplify to 2(x-3)^-1 and the i plug in my limit value which gives me 1/4^-1 or 4. is that all correct?

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  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yep thats what i did

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  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you very much

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  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    See if you can follow this...previous scan cut off

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i could follow it thanks so much

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  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im assuming i will start understanding them when i we start talking about them in calc because we will go in depth with them, in physics we spent one day on them

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  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah, usually get into limits when your learning the fundamentals of calculus. it's usually anything but exciting when your doing limits. good luck

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spraguer (Moderator)
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