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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

If h(t) represents the height of an object above ground level at time t and h(t) is given by: h(t)=-16t^2+14t+1 find the speed at time t=0.

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    this is physics. use that forum.

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    im learning this in calculus

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    oh cool. calc AB or BC. that determines how to do this.

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    idk. its my first calc class. its the intro course.

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    uhhh... do you know how to differentiate? or take limits?

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    we just started doing that in class. not too keen on it yet.

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ok so the derivative of position is velocity because the "change" in position is velocity. so differentiate h(x)

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i dont know what it means to differentiate

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i thought you just plug in for T?

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ok do you know how to: 1) take a derivative 2) find a limit? which one do you know...basically what are you doing in class now?

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    we just started derivatives and limits... we've mainly been doing rate of change where you plug in something in the function.

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    eh. you have to take the derivative of that.. or just use the limit definition of the derivative to take the derivative...you need to do one.

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    can you show me how to do that?

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    v(t) = dh/dt = -32t + 14

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    v(0) = 0 + 14

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Therefore , Answer = 14

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ok so the derivative of something is taking the 2 from the square and multiplying it by the coefficient... what happened to the +1 at the end of the function?

  18. phi
    • 4 years ago
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    derivative of a constant = 0

  19. phi
    • 4 years ago
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    think of it as 1*t^0

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1327531319590:dw|

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1327531370597:dw|

  22. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    cant i just multiply whatever the coefficient is by 2 and then plug in the last number for T or whatever other letter and get the right answer every time?

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1327531709121:dw|

  24. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    and then plug zero for the first T of course to get the right answer

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