A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Find the net electric flux through the spherical closed surface shown in the figure below. The two charges on the right are inside the spherical surface. (Take q1 = +1.84 nC, q2 = +1.02 nC, and q3 = -2.91 nC.) N · m2/C

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  2. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    By Gauss' theorem, the flux through a Gaussian surface is equal to the sum of the charges inside the surface scaled by 1/4.pi.e0. use that result.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so (Q2+Q3)1/4.pi.e0?

  4. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    they're the only charges in the surface, yes. I strongly recommend you watch the lecture I just linked in your other question.

  5. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    **correction: no 4.pi. That goes away in the integration.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i was wondering why i was getting the wrong answer lol

  7. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You know you're in danger in Physics when you're using equations and you don't know where they come from. Use that rule to be intellectually honest with yourself: what is this equation, where did come from, what does it mean physically, can I derive it from first principles in physics?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hmm... so I'm getting ((1.02x10^9)-(-2.91x10^9)/8.85x10^12=-2.14x10^-20 ?? that doesn't seem right

  9. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That's not the value of the permittivity in a vacuum. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_permittivity

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oops.. i had put -12 in the calculator.. but not on here. my bad.

  11. JamesJ
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Also the charges are in nano Coulomb, not giga Coulomb ! -9, not +9

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    god.. i hate stupid mistakes. lol

  13. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.