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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

BaCl2+ NaCl--->

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  1. Xishem
    • 5 years ago
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    Seeing as there is no driving force for the reaction (i.e., no precipitate, water, or gas would form; it's not a redox reaction), no reaction would occur. \[BaCl_{2}+NaCl \rightarrow NR\]

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so how do u determine their states?

  3. Xishem
    • 5 years ago
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    There are no products, so there is no way to determine their states. There is no reaction that occurs between those two compounds.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah i just realised that

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    but in general how do u determine the sates of your product after the reatants do react

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do u know whether is solid,aqueous or gas

  7. Xishem
    • 5 years ago
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    It depends what type of reaction it is. To determine the products of a reaction, you need to know if it's a precipitation reaction, acid-base reduction reaction, gas-forming reaction, or redox reaction. If it's a precipitation reaction, the cations of each reactant bond with the anion of the other cation. The precipitate, which will be (s) is determined by solubility rules ( http://www.files.chem.vt.edu/RVGS/ACT/notes/solubility_rules.html), and the other product is in aqueous sol'n If it's an acid-base reduction reaction, the products are always a salt (in aqueous sol'n) and water (liquid). If it's a gas-forming reaction, it's a salt (aq), some gas (g), and sometimes water (l) Redox reactions are much harder to predict products for.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok thanks,let me read it up right away :)

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Oops! the link doesnt work

  10. Xishem
    • 5 years ago
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    http://www.files.chem.vt.edu/RVGS/ACT/notes/solubility_rules.html

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