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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

Hello Everyone!! In Physics I'm good with Diffrentiations and Integrations but I don't know when to apply them in a problem... Can Anyone give me that clear idea about that.. Please???

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    What kind of calculus are you good at, exactly? Single variable? :)

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yea... I am..... But Please give me idea about when to appy these both things in a Physics problem!!

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    How about this.... the acceleration of an object is the second-derivative of the position function with respect to time, i.e. \[ a(t) = x''(t) \] let's say a(t) = 0. What is x''(t)? You'll need two unknown constants for this.

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    oops, what is x(t), not x''(t) :)

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Thanks!!! :-D

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Oh my goodness I'm sorry. let's say a(t) = a0, a constant :) Can you integrate the equation twice to find the answer?

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    And to better answer your question... calculus is important in basic physics because you better understand concepts like velocity (which is the derivative of position wrt time). The really important applications of calculus to physics come when you learn multivariable calculus and vector calculus, which unfortunately will probably take quite a while but since our world is (ostensibly... ;) ) 3-dimensional, single-dimensional calculus applications are comparatively rare.

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    If you have some conservative force, like gravity or the spring force or the electrostatic force, then \[ F = -\frac{d}{dx} U\] where U is the associated potential energy.

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Thanks!! :-D

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