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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

I NEED VECTOR HELP!!! CAN ANYONE HERE DO CAL 2 CALCULATIONS???

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Find two unit vectors that make an angle of 60° with v = ‹6, 8›. Give your answers correct to three decimal places.

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ANYONE????

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I tried, sitting this one out. Will be watching with great interest.

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ROACHIE sorry :(

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    :P

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ill give you a medal if someone figures this out...lol

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ah!

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    what is the magnitude of u?

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |v|=10

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    6a + 8b = \[\left| u \right|\] (10)(1/2)

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ... u?

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    by theorem 3 we need u * v = \[\left| v \right| \left| u \right|\] cos 60

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    would u be 1?

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{a ^{2}+b^{2}}\]

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    if i knew what the magnitude of u was i could figure this problem out.

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    oh, u=<6,8>??

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    right?

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    u = <a,b>

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    v = <6,8>

  20. dumbcow
    • 4 years ago
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    the magnitude of u (unit vector) is 1 i dont remember the formula for that theorem you were referring

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yea, I dont know where u came from but yes, u being a unit vector has magnitude 1

  22. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    6a + 8b = 5 therefore b=5/8 - 3/4a

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    a^2 + (5/8 -3/4a)^2 = 1

  24. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ?? any thoughts on that?

  25. dumbcow
    • 4 years ago
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    where does the 5 come from?

  26. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    1/2 (10)

  27. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    u * v = |v||u| cos 60 now I see u, duh

  28. dumbcow
    • 4 years ago
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    why are we dividing 10 (|v|) by 2

  29. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    cos of 60 is 1/2

  30. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    someone want to factor that out for me...

  31. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    because im sure to f THAT up.

  32. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    if we know that u is a unit vector then v * u = |v|cos 60 if you unit vector v then v*u = cos 60 that how I think of it...

  33. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    im not following r . . . . .

  34. dumbcow
    • 4 years ago
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    haha...25/64 -30/32a +9/16a^2

  35. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    v-hat = v/|v|

  36. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    then quadratic... fun fun

  37. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |v-hat|=1

  38. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    30/32 +- \[\sqrt{30/32^{2}-4(25/64)(9/16)}/2(25/64)\]

  39. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    fml

  40. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    did you add the original a^2 to the factor? dumbcow?

  41. dumbcow
    • 4 years ago
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    no i didn;t multiply everything by 64 100a^2 -60a -39 = 0 a = -.3928, .9928

  42. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    then i need to plug those back into 5/8 -3/4a to find b right?

  43. dumbcow
    • 4 years ago
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    yep

  44. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    <-.3928,.9196> and <.9928, -.1196>

  45. dumbcow
    • 4 years ago
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    looks good

  46. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    YES!!!!!

  47. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    thank god!

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