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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

Ionic Equations. Na2CO3+AgNO3 --> NaNO3 + Ag2Co3 B: Separate Aqueous solutions, remove spectator ions. C: Net Ionic Equation.

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    For B, I got 2Na + CO3(2-) +AG(+) + NO3(-) -->Na(+) + NO3(-) + Ag2CO3 C was CO3(2-) +Ag(+) --> Ag2CO3. Do you know if these are right?

  2. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Silver carbonate is your insoluble precipitate.\[2Na _{}^{+} + CO _{3}^{2-} + 2Ag _{}^{+} + 2NO _{3}^{-} \rightarrow 2Na _{}^{+} + 2NO _{3}^{-} + Ag _{2}^{}CO _{3}^{} (s)\] Cancel out the spectator ions \[CO _{3}^{2-} + 2Ag _{}^{+} \rightarrow Ag _{2}^{}CO _{3}^{} (s)\]

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Why does the Ag on the left have a two in front of it? I noticed this in class, but I could never figure out why.

  4. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    So the equation could be balanced, in your equation the # of Ag's on the reactant side does not equal the product side.

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I get it. In my class, we do the balancing at the end, during the NET phase. Our teacher saw no reason to balance ahead of time, if some may just be canceled out as spectator ions.

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Thanks for the help. Up for some more? I've got seven left. Seven very painful, very chemical, very annoying problems.

  7. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Sure, but I won't be solving them, I'll tell you what to do if you get stuck :P

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    CURSES. My ultimate plan, foiled. You and your stupid dog. The next one I have is Pb(NO3)2 +Na2CO3.

  9. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Its pretty much like the last one, but your insoluble precipitate is Phosphorous Carbonate this time.

  10. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Oops, lead carbonate

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Roger. Give me some time. Like.... an hour. Chemistry is my hardest subject.

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ಠ_ಠ

  13. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Are you take college chemistry or AP chem in high school?

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Chem in high school. It's a cool class and the teacher is awesome, but its so hard. DX Our teacher likes setting things on fire. :)

  15. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Sounds fun, last year for ap chem, we had the boring teacher :(

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Ouch. I'd hate that. Our teacher makes it enjoyable. Mostly because she acquaints everything with a Metaphor. One of the most memorable ones was selling and buying babies, as electrons.

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Wait a minute. How did you get Phosphorous Carbonate? My results were PbCO3 + NaNO3 Did you mean Lead Carbonate?

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Or lead something?

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    *DERP* Just read below it.

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    K. Results were Pb(NO3)2 + Na2CO3 --> PbCO3 + Na(NO3)

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    The precipitate is confusing me most. I don't know if I got it right. o.o

  22. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Yeah, that seems right, then just separate them into the ions and cancel. The precipitate is the compound that remains a solid dissolved in the aqueous solution; it does not ionize.

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Got it. Step A is the hardest to me. Separating & finding NET are much easier. :)

  24. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    By the way - What's the charge on lead? It's between the negatives and the positives. Confused.

  25. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    2+ in this situation.

  26. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Thank you. I knew it was either 2+ or 4+.

  27. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I've got it all set out, what would it be as Balanced? Mine reads: 2 (NO3)2 + Na2 --> 2 Na(NO3) I'm just wondering if my balancing at the end is interfering with anything.

  28. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    :O Na(NO3) ? thats a spectator.

  29. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Pb(NO3)2 + Na2CO3 --> PbCO3 + Na(NO3) Pb2+ + CO3 2- --> PbCO3

  30. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I SEE IT. I MESSED UP. I switched the Na(NO3) and the Lead Carbonate. :D At least it was minor.

  31. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Mkay. The adjustments made me right. Thanks for that. ಠ_ಠ

  32. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    The next one is Pb(NO3)2 + Na3PO4 --> PbPO4 + Na(NO3)2. Is that right for the first step?

  33. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Your products don't have the right formulas. Lead phosphate is Pb3PO4. Sodium nitrate is NaNO3.

  34. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Why does the 2 after Sodium Nitrate go away? I see how I messed up the other one.

  35. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    NEVERMIND. I see it. Thanks again. :)

  36. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    :o Is the charge on lead still 2+, or 4+ this time? ;o

  37. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ಠ_ಠ Stupid question. Nevermind.

  38. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Look at the reactant, Pb(NO3)2. When criss crossed charge is +2.

  39. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    :) I noticed. Thank you~ :D I need to look more before asking questions. :<

  40. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Which one was the precip? :O Lead Phosphate?

  41. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Mhm. Use page 2 on this PDF to determine which one is the precipitate. The insoluble compounds are the precipitates. http://www.p12.nysed.gov/apda/reftable/chemistry-rt/chemrt-2011.pdf

  42. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    :O Thank you. I feel comfortable with these enough to try them on my own. You've been a great help. :D Thanks~!

  43. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Alright, no problem, good luck :)

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