anonymous
  • anonymous
An air bubble at the bottom of a lake 43.5m deep has a volume of 1.00cm/cubed. If the temperature at the bottom is 5.5 degrees celcius and at the top 21.0 degrees celcius, what is the volume of the bubble just before it reaches the surface.
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Are we ignoring pressure effects here? These are more substantial than temperature effects.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
and how do i convert Celsius to kelvin

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
K = C + 273
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do you have the volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion for air? Otherwise, we will have to use the ideal gas law which requires we make some assumptions.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think well have to use ideal gas law
anonymous
  • anonymous
Then pressure is definitely being accounted for. First, let's find the pressure at the bottom of the lake. \[P_b = \rho g h + P_{atm}\]where \(P_{atm} = 101 kPa = 1 atm = 14.7 psi\) Now, from ideal gas law, \[\left [ PV \over n RT \right ]_{bottom} = \left [ PV \over nRT \right ] _{t o p}\]n remains constant so it cancels out. We just calculated the pressure at the bottom, the pressure at the top will be equal to \(P_{atm}\). We know the volume at the bottom and the two temperatures. Leaving the volume at the top the only unknown.
anonymous
  • anonymous
what do i plug in for pressure at the bottom of the lake
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you show me what to plug in
anonymous
  • anonymous
You have to solve for it It is\[P_{Bottom} = \rho gh + P_{atm}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
but what do i put in for density
anonymous
  • anonymous
and is the g gravity 9.8
anonymous
  • anonymous
Depends on what units you want. Looks like we are in SI, so density would be 1000 kg/m^3 for water, and g is definitely 9.8.
anonymous
  • anonymous
right right
anonymous
  • anonymous
h would be 43.5
anonymous
  • anonymous
Indeed. The height of the water column above the bubble.
anonymous
  • anonymous
right
anonymous
  • anonymous
p.s. your a genius man
anonymous
  • anonymous
what do i put for nRT
anonymous
  • anonymous
8.314
anonymous
  • anonymous
for R. T must be in kelvin.
anonymous
  • anonymous
how did you get that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
The n cancels out. because it does not change.
anonymous
  • anonymous
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_constant
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
help me on the other one

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