A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 4 years ago

Suppose there are two known compounds containing generic X and Y. You have a 1.00g sample of each compound. One sample contains .34g of X and the other contains .44g of X. Identify plausible sets of formulas for the two compounds

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I've started it by taking 1.00g-.34=.66g Y (Sample 1) and 1.00g-.44g=.56g Y (Sample 2) I've been given sets of answers such as X2Y3 and X3Y3 XY3 and XY4 and a few more. How can I determine what subscripts would work?

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm not positive this is correct, but this is what I came up with: the amount of moles of each element (X1/X2 or Y1/Y2) should be related when you divide them; with this ratio, you can multiply by a number and use the numbers that are closest to whole numbers (as in the real world, measuring the weight will always be slightly off). For example, if I had 24gC and 36gC and I divided them (24/36), I get 0.666...; multiplying by 1 or 2 doesn't give a whole number, but multiplying by 3 yields 2, showing the molar ratio to be 2:3 (as you could clearly see in the above example with C as 12g/mol). So, with all of that said, it was easiest to throw the numbers into excel and have it calculate numbers and the closest one to whole numbers with viable ratios: X=7,9.059 Y=7.072,6\[X_7Y_7 and X_9Y_6\]which, reduced gives\[XY\]and\[X_3Y_2\]

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I figured it out after I got it wrong a couple of times. I had to find x/y for both samples. Then put (Solution 1 x/y)/ (Solution 2 x/y) After that I had to take the subscripts of the first set of values in the given answers find the ratio and put it over the x y ratio for the second formula. All in all I think it was a silly question that cost me a few points. Thank you for replying!

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can you explain what you were doing wrong?

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sadly no. It was so long ago I no longer remember. I had trouble following what I wrote and don't even understand what I was saying. Sorry.

  6. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.