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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

Degrees or Radians for this? What should the answer roughly look like?

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I know how to get the hypotenuse. How do I answer the rest?

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    and do I use degrees or radians for my calculations?

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    In order to computer the hypotenuse you do not need radians or degrees. To find the hypotenuse or more appropriately the length of the hypotenuse use Pythagorean theorem. Which is length of hypotenuse = sqrt( a^2 + b^2).

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    thanks but i said i already know that, i'm asking about the functions

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Ok. Lets take a look. I believe they want cos, sin, tan, sec, csc and cot of angle theta is that right?

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yep

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Ok. First we need to compute the length of the hypotenuse. For #1 that would be sqrt(144 + 81) = 15. Is that what you get?

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yeah i got 15

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Ok. The cos of theta is the length of the side opposite the angle theta divided by the length the hypotenuse. or cos(theta) = 9/15 = 3/5 = 0.6. For sin(theta) = length of adjacent side from theta/ hypotenuse = 12/15 = 4/5 = 0.8.

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    the thing about these problems that are confusing (and math teachers never mention is) is that you are asked to evaluate a function at a number, but you do not know what that number is. in fact it is not important because you are really being asked for ratios of sides of a triangle

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Tan(theta) = sin/cos = 0.8/0.6 = 4/3.

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    commdoc has your answers, and in truth it doesn't matter how you measure the angle because if you measure it in radians then you would take your sine and cosine etc as functions of radians, and if you measured in degrees you would take them in degrees

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    okay i understand...so you only need to know how to functions work in respect to the sides of the triangle? you do not need to know the angle values for this problem?

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes.

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    right exactly you can find the angles using the inverse trig buttons on your calculator, but they are not necessary for the problem

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    again i say it is a bit odd, because you are asked to find \[f(a)\] without knowing "a"

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    so, last question: what is the difference between radians and degrees?

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    2*pi*rad = 360 degrees is your conversion.

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    So if you take 360 and divide by 2*pi this will give you the number of radians in 360 or approx 57.297

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    If you are using your calculator the compute the angles you must be sure which mode your calculator is in, either radians or degrees.

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Satellite is right about calculating the function. Here we are calculating the inverse problem where f(a) = x. We know x but we want to know a. Here a = f^-1(x).

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