A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 4 years ago

integrate sqrt((x^3 -3)/x^11)

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1327888347751:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ?

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    maybe we can take out that annoying \[x^{11}\] in the denominator and write is as \[\frac{1}{x^5}\sqrt{\frac{x^3-3}{x}}\]

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no that doesn't work. hmmm

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the answer in the back of the book is 2/27 (1-3/x^3)^(3/2)+C

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i got the answer from wolfram, but not the "show steps" and the answer makes it look like a u - sub so maybe we can arrange it to be one

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it is supposed to be solved by u substitution

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok i have another idea. write it as \[\frac{1}{x^4}\sqrt{\frac{x^3-3}{x^3}}\] and then make \[u=\frac{x^3-3}{x^3}\]

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that will do it.

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay, thankyou so much

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    let me try that

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yw let me know if you run in to any problems, but a miracle will occur when you find \[du\] it will be just what you want

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay lol for sure.

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it gives me (9/x^7) as du.. :/

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    check again, should be \[\frac{9}{x^4}\] as needed

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok i am gunna one more time.

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\frac{d}{dx}\frac{x^3-3}{x^3}=\frac{x^3\times 3x^2-3x^2\times (x^3-3)}{x^6}\]

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    all the \[x^5\] terms go, you get \[\frac{9x^2}{x^6}=\frac{9}{x^4}\]

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    in fact you cannot get a power of 7 in the denominator, because \[(x^3)^2=x^6\]

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh shoot, i see my mistake, thankyou.. i was trying to do it with product rule

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    everyone thinks that is the easy way, but believe me it is not. even wolfram does it that way, but then you have to add the fractions an no one is good at that

  22. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah you are right, i will try not to use it, btw thankyou so much, ur a life saver

  23. myininaya
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\frac{d}{dx}(\frac{x^3-3}{x^3})=\frac{d}{dx}(1-\frac{3}{x^3})\] quotient rule not needed but good work (the credit for this little part goes to JamesJ) Great work on figuring out the substitution, satellite. You're awesome! :)

  24. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\color{red}{\text{blush}}\]

  25. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.