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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

A fair coin is flipped four times. What is the probability of getting heads at least once? Write your answer as a simplified fraction.

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    pls use the complement approach

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    That's what I would have thought anyway. What's the probability of not getting heads at all?

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ah the probability is getting all tails

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Which is?

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    it is 1/2*1/2*1/2*1/2

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    1/16

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    so whts ur reply?

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, that's correct. Now, there are only two possibilities: Either we get no heads or at all, or we get at least one. So, since the probabilities must add to one, what do we get?

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    p(of having atlesat one head)=1-p(of having no head)

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    1-1/16=15/16

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    there ya go

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    welll my maths sucks

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Hahah well you handled that fine

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    is there any algorith to solve probability ques

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    No, they need to be solved on a case-by-case basis.

  16. Directrix
    • 4 years ago
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    You can use Binomial Probability Distributions to solve the problem. It is an algorithm of sorts. P(at least 1 H) = 1 - P(0H) = 1 - C(4,0) (1/2)^0 (1/2)^4 = 1 - 1 (1/16) = 15/16. Note that C(4,0) is combinatorial notation for 4 choose 0. Check out this video on binomial probabilities: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNLQuuvE9ug

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    what is a combinatoral notation?

  18. Directrix
    • 4 years ago
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    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Combination.html Also, http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Combinatorics.html

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    got it u are taking about combination notation of nCr.....

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    murray what is the other notations for combinations

  21. Directrix
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1327912574413:dw|

  22. cristiann
    • 4 years ago
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    You should get yourself used to think in terms of "events". "the probability of getting all tails" is (1/2)^4 because the events are independent: the event of getting a tail at one throw doesn't affect the event of getting a tail at another throw....

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    thanx cristann ....is this rule applicable in a pack of cards?

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