Open study

is now brainly

With Brainly you can:

  • Get homework help from millions of students and moderators
  • Learn how to solve problems with step-by-step explanations
  • Share your knowledge and earn points by helping other students
  • Learn anywhere, anytime with the Brainly app!

A community for students.

Why em waves cannot be deflected by a suitable magnetic or an electric field? My doubt is, something made of oscillating magnetic and electric field cannot be deflected by an external field why so?

Physics
See more answers at brainly.com
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Join Brainly to access

this expert answer

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

To see the expert answer you'll need to create a free account at Brainly

Hmm is bending what you mean by deflection?
yea yea..
actually bending is possible or at least in my knowledge, do you remember the J.J Thompson experiment? the electron discharge tube one in which he placed two magnets by the tube causing the ray to bend. I am not so sure lemme check my book.

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question

Other answers:

that was the ray of electrons not em waves!
and no light is not bended by any external electric or magnetic fields at all!! :-/.. i just can't find a simple explanation!
oh yeah sorry
but hmm what if i have a magnet with me and i expose it to an em wave, wouldn't the magnetic field of the magnet cause change in the magnetic field of em wave which further would cause change in electric field.
NOO>. nothing of that sort happens.. if that were true, you would be able to deflect light, visible light via magnetic and electric fields..!! but that doesn't happen.. not one bit!
see its an interesting question.. until james would come and explain us :D!!
and what about refraction, why do you think light bends in denser medium i think maybe because atoms are closely packed together and when light has to go through them it gets effected due to their electromagnetic field... maybe not sure
no no.. bending of light is PUUREEELLLYYYY due to the fact that the velocity of the light slows down!..
strange none of my ideas work
but this stuff is interesting
dude you are in second puc, when i was in second puc, i didn't EVEN THINK ABOUT THESE STUFFFFF, you are like WAY WAY WAY ahead of me when i was your age!!
it's in the course this is why i know about it
i mean not this but a little explanation about it
even i had it in my course.. and i never gave a thought to it :P
thanks, you like physics which counts more and being passionate about it earns you bonus points you will definitely do good if you get in physics
ok this is what i got from some site "There is no first order interaction between light and an electric or magnetic field IN VACUUM until you achieve such intense fields that the vacuum decays (a nucleus with Z=1/(α) or a magnetic field about 100X as powerful as a magnetar). Also consider the Sharnhorst effect.".. so i guess what that means is we cannot create strong enough fields to deflect them may be! :-/
oh hmm maybe so what happens in processes like polarization if polarization can reduce light's intensity can't something like that help in bending of light?

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question