A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 4 years ago

does anyone know an algebraic way to solve ln(t)-t=ln(9.21), a better question is there an algebraic way, I think there has to be

  • This Question is Closed
  1. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I don't think there is a simple algebraic way to do this. There are perhaps more advanced techniques oh satellite know I bet

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\ln(t)-t<0\] so there is no solution

  3. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no real solution...

  4. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=+solve+ln%28t%29-t%3Dln%289.21%29

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you are not going to find that using algebra, i am almost certain

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    any ideas how wolfram took it to imaginary plane

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ln(t)−t=2.22.....

  8. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah can't proceed from there because of what sat pointed out

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what's the technique then to solve it going to imaginary numbers?

  10. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It depends on the situation de moivre, complex analysis, etc... sometimes you can get imaginary numbers with just the quadratic formula

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you usually define \[\log(z)\] in the complex plane as \[\log(z)=\log(r)+i\theta\] but the function is not single values unless you specify \[0\leq \theta <2\pi\] or some other interval of length \[2\pi\] because the polar form of a complex number is not unique

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanks for the help

  13. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.