anonymous
  • anonymous
Identifying sentence patterns In the following sentences, identify each verb as intransitive, transitive, or linking. Then identify each direct object (DO), indirect object (IO), subject complement (SC), and object complement (OC). 1. Many people find New York City exciting. 2. Tourists flock to New York each year. 3. Often they visit Times Square first. 4. The square's lights are astounding. 5. The flashing signs sell visitors everything from TV's to underwear.
Writing
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Are you a able to figure any of these out on your own, or have you already done so? If so, which ones do you get, which ones are you uncertain of?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I haven't figured out any of them, they seem confusing to me.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ah, then you need to start with basics to make sense of the questions. If I (or anyone else) just throw you the answers, that won't help you to understand similar questions when they arise -- in class, in exercises, in quizzes, in exams. I have to dash. Maybe someone else can get the ball rolling? I'll check in later in the day.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Let me ask this as a starter: are you good on identifying the verbs in each sentence? Not the type of verb, just that the word in question is (or is not) a verb.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, so you're clear on which words in each sentence are verbs? Then what's not clear yet is identifying the patterns that follow the verbs? The basic patterns are -- linking + SC (adjective or noun) intransitive transitive + DO transitive + IO + DO . . . and then various versions of those last two, with object complements thrown in. Points to note -- (1) The SC is an adjective or a noun that restates the S (which generally appears before the verb). You can think of the linking verb as an equals sign. S = SC (That's not an exact relationship, but it's the general idea.) (2) The IO and DO are always nouns. The action of the verb transfers to them in some way, sort of like the verb is an arrow. S ---> DO or S ---> IO + DO (3) The intransitive (= not transitive) verb doesn't transfer anything anywhere. If you chop the sentence off at the verb, you still have a grammatically complete sentence. If you can do that, the verb is intransitive in that sentence. (The sentence will not say the same thing, because you'll have left a lot off, but it will be a grammatically possible sentence with all of the main parts of the sentence intact.) Some verbs can be used both transitively and intransitively, which can confuse the issue. * * * * There are a limited number of linking verbs (including all forms of the verb "to be"), and those can be the easiest to spot. Does the first sentence contain a linking verb? (So do "many people" = "New York"?) No. Which of the remaining sentences contain a linking verb then? If you find the linking verb, you have also found the subject complement. It will be the adjective or noun (or adjective phrase or noun phrase) that follows the verb and either restates (identifies) or describes the subject in some way. Ex. She is a skater. (she = skater) He is a dancer. (he = dancer) That person is reckless. (person = reckless) You can see that the "equals" relationship isn't exact with adjectives, which describe someone rather than restating who they are in some way. But it still gives you the general idea. In the third example just above, the word "reckless" refers back to the subject. It does not refer to anything else in any other place in the sentence. Does this help? If so, find the linking verb + SC, and we can move on to the others.
anonymous
  • anonymous
All right thanks for pointing that out to me.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So, does this help? Do you want to work through the sentences? I imagine you can find the linking verb + SC pretty quickly. If so, we can move onto the others if you would like.

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