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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    No! It's vastly overrated. I mean, it's a fun read, and E.B. White is himself a wonderful writer, but it is not the best text for writing by any means. What sorts of reference/tutorial books are you looking for? What have you already got?

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I haven't got any real writing references. I just want to write properly and tersely.

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I figured that pocket-sized book might be of some use.

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Go instead for _Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace_ or the briefer _Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace_, by Joseph Williams.

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Check out this review of _The Elements of Style_ -- http://chronicle.com/article/50-Years-of-Stupid-Grammar/25497

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Ouch; I thought The Elements of Style was THE reference for folks who need to learn to trim their writing.

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, well it is much touted as being that.

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Nothing against E.B. White. He is a superb stylist. His own writing ignores much of the advice of the book, which he revised from a book one of his own teachers had written to teach his classes.

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I think I shall go for Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace (or the Basic version) once I toss strunk and white back to the free bin I found it in.

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Well, no, don't toss it away! It has some fun bits. Just don't follow it slavishly. Don't look to it for consistent, precise advice.

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Don't use it as your teacher.

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    What are the good bits of The Elements of Style?

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    It's written in an engaging style. The longer essay-like passages can be fun to read. You might even pick up a few good pointers. Not all of the advice is good. Not all of it is consistent. The treatment overall is not complete. It will not do as a textbook.

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I really like its tiny size though; reminds me of the C programming language book, which is not only THE reference for ANSI C, but is also a handy reference book.

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, it's a lovely size. :)

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Read Geoffrey Pullman's very excellent review of the book and then see what you think. But do pick up one of the two Williams books and study it.

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    If only my high school textbooks were as tiny as strunk and white :(

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    lol !!!

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Would Strunk and White deserves space in my pocket as a handy reference?

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Read Pullman's review and you decide. You need to understand its biases and limitations if you're to use it well. Otherwise, it will lead you down the wrong path on many points. Or be just plain unhelpful.

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Right. I'll check out the reviews for the Clarity and Grace books as well

  22. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I know there are reviews out there, but I can't seem to find them now. You might try this one, from a prof over at Berkeley (he's not in the writing department) -- http://www.j-bradford-delong.net/econ_articles/reviews/williams.html I can tell you that it is THE book a developmental editor I know uses to teach novice editors how to edit.

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I should clarify: he uses the first book, but that's the longer, denser version without exercises. The editor-teacher supplies those. For your purposes, you'd want one of the other two.

  24. jagatuba
    • 4 years ago
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    Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft by Janet Burroway is one of my favorite books one writing. It's not pocket sized, but it covers poetry, stort story,and play writing quite well with lots of exercises and tips. It's an easy and entertaining read with lot's of examples from other authors to illustrate the mechanics that are being discussed in the chapters.

  25. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I don't know that one! I'll have to check it out . . .

  26. jagatuba
    • 4 years ago
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    It was my textbook for ENG495.I'm glad I took that course because I likely would have never discovered the book. :)

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